Pete Cohen talks with Burzynski Patient

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2010 I was laying in on my couch; and I had been treated for cancer in the past, but evidentially reoccurrence, and I, I was so sick on my bed
Actually on the couch
I couldn’t get up
My neighbor called me, uh, and, uh, I couldn’t even, I had the phone next to me and I could answer it, but I think I was laying on the couch for about 2 days
Finally got a nurse over there to check my temperature, at 105.8
They rushed me to the hospital
Didn’t even give me but a few days to live (laugh), and, uh, they wanted to treat me and do so forth, but my, uh, sister-in-law had been reading a little about the Burzynski Clinic
She gave me some information on it
There was a few other places that I was looking at, but I was felt lead to come here, and, uh, actually the doctors wouldn’t even allow me out of the hospital to come here
They said I would never make it, and so, uh, my brother who insisted upon getting me out there
So I came out
Took a, a van
Took it
Came out here, and, uh, I couldn’t walk
Couldn’t hold a pencil in my hand
I could hardly sit up in a chair (laugh), much less anything else
And, uh, within, with just within a few weeks of, of some treatment I could actually get up and walk and so forth
Then as time went, I was able to walk a little more, and then I was able to drive, and now I’m being able to read and write and the whole thing, so, and as of today I just got my final report, and that final report, (?) the last report that I’ve actually, looked like there’s no active cancer at all
There’s some tumors left and some little shades here
Scar tissue
So, I’m continuing on, on the treatment, but so far, I thank God, and I’m still here, and, uh, gave me some extra time here
So I’m thankful
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Wow
So when were you first diagnosed with ?
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2003
I was diagnosed with, uh, lymphoma
Uh, we were going in for heart repla, my 6th hernia operation (laugh) and the found it in my abdomen, and so they immediately took me to the, get a port and get me on the chemo and so forth, and, uh, the 1st chemo treatment I, I almost didn’t, I almost didn’t survive
I was rushed to the hospital
They, they didn’t expect me to make it the night
However, I did make it, and a couple times there were a couple problems there
Then I went through radiation and some, uh, some other treatment for about 2 or 3 years here
Some remission, uh
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And what was your health like during that time ?
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Uh, it was, my immune system was quite down
I was catching colds
I was getting pneumonia and things
Uh, not pneumonia but almost on the edge of it but always weak, and, uh, coming here, you know, it, it’s a lot different
It, its reach a little more compassionately
There’s a little bit more, uh, with not as much side effects and hardly as much side effects as, as, as the other treatments
Still been able to drive, fly, and everything else and, and, uh, so, uh, with the, I, I just find with the multi-approach that they have here, uh, you know, all the different ways they attack it, not just one or two different ways that should become standard, that doctors actually looked outside the box, and discovered things that, uh, uh, are, are just fantastic, and that’s one of the things
I like to do a lot of research, and I just found, what I found here just clicked, and thank God I’m here today
So (laughing)
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Wow
So the 1st time you had, when you were diagnosed
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2000
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2000 you had chemotherapy
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Yes
Radiation treatment, and I had some Zebulon radiation treatment and so forth
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And then, how long were you kinda, well you can’t (?)
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Well (?), 2007 and then, uh, they wanted to do a bone marrow transplant, and they had to give me more dose of chemo which would have been stronger than the 1st, and I almost didn’t make it the 1st time
So I just
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You said “No”
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I said I just, I just won’t
I can’t do that
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And what did your oncologist say ?
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Uh, well, he didn’t have much of a choice
I didn’t really wanna take that route
He says “Well, there’s no other choice,” basically
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There’s nothing more we can do for you
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Well, no
That’s, that’s, that’s
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(?) go home and die
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Well, no
That was their
That was their next line of treatment, that, and that was it
Bone marrow transplants, so forth, uh, which, you know, that’s within their perimeter, but here he treats it a little but more outside, with the different, different methods that he has, with the DNA and the, and the, uh, uh, treating the vascular part of the cell, uh, and the tumor, to choke off the supply of the nutrients, and so forth
Uh, just the whole multi-faceted approach, which actually, uh, which, which I, when I read it I said “Wow, here’s one that’s really on top of this thing,” and, and I know there’s been some, uh, uh, uh, envy sometimes from the (laughing) medical field, and that’s just natural of anything
I mean, I’ve been in real estate for years, and worked, uh, different ways that, you know, when you come up with a different method, a lot of people don’t want to change so easy
So I’m pretty familiar with that
Uh, so I just, I just have found that, uh, uh, just the overall way I’ve been treated here
It’s just, it’s just really refreshing
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So you, you, you came down here when, which, in?
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November 2010
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You came down (?)
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From Miami
From actually Fort Lauderdale
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Right
And, um, how soon, you said it was in a couple of weeks you were
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Yeah, within, within a few weeks I was actually starting to feel a bit better
I was starting to walk a bit more
I couldn’t even walk 10 feet without, you know, being so exhausted
Then I’d walk up to 50 feet
Then I’d walk up to 100 feet
Then I’d, by the time Christmas came around I flew back to Orlando to visit my sister and, uh, I was actually able to walk about 5 or 6 blocks to go to the grocery store and back
Got, got lost somewhere
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What was that like ?
You know, the realization that you were alive and you were well again ?
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Well, you know, uh, uh, again, uh, I was at the point before, and I have my, I have peace with my maker so I don’t know, one way, way I’d have gone if have been happy (?) but I,
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You were prepared to go
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but I’m prepared to go, but I have a young daughter and, uh, and a lot of family still here
So I didn’t wanna, I didn’t wanna go just yet (laughing)
So I’m thankful, with the treatment and by the grace of God I’m still here, and so, I look at, uh, uh, uh, you know, where I was at
Uh, I just, uh, realized the direction I was given to come out here, uh, and, uh, uh, uh, uh, uh, took advantage of it, and you see what, what took place
So I’m thankful
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And, and what, what treatment were you on when you 1st came here ?
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I wasn’t really on any treatment at the time
I, I, I, I wasn’t going to go back and do the bone marrow although it’s still an option and some people might wanna use it
I just wanted to do it different, way
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And what treatment did they put on, on, put you on when you came here ?
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Uh, well they gave me, I did take some infusions to get my health back into shape
I was, uh, uh, a little malnourished here and there, uh, they uh, uh, uh
I’m not really coherent really what was going on back then
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Yeah, right
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My brother, and sister-in-law, and my sister were all here with me
They were kinda keeping on top of things
I was kinda trying to just keep breathing
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Yeah
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(laughing)
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So, uh, and what about
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I vaguely remember some of the things I went through
I couldn’t even get out of bed in some instances, and my folks had to help me here and there
So
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What about now ?
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Uh, in, in regarding ?
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Your health now
What, what
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Well, uh, I, I, I feel, uh, I feel good
I mean, there, there’s still, uh
I mean I
I’m, uh
I used to play football years ago
I still have a lot of injuries from that and I’m still (laughing)
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Yeah
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I’m walking around with, but other than that I feel pretty good
I mean I, you know, I’m very thankful, I’m
I’ve been able to go out and do a number of things I hadn’t been able to do before
I spend time with my daughter as much as I can, and I’m very grateful for that
It makes a big difference
Uh
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Yeah, I bet
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Um, I just, uh, uh, I’m grateful for, for, you know, the way the doctors treat and the staff here
Uh, the I.V. nurses have just, I mean, uh, have just been phenomenal for me and I’m just, I’m very grateful for what they’ve done here
The staff
The welcoming committee
Everybody else
They keep on top of what’s going on
They know where you’re at
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So why do you think more people aren’t treated the way you’re treated as far as cancer’s concerned ?
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Well I, well I think there’s, uh, you know, uh
Anytime there’s anything new, there’s always a hesitation, uh, which in a way is reasonable, but when you begin to see it documented and coming forth to be true, then you pretty much know it’s more established, and so you, uh, are more willing to go in that direction and, uh, I, uh, what I went through before I didn’t really want to go through again, uh, with the chemo and the radiation and so forth
Uh, I just, uh, uh, you know, I almost didn’t last through it
So I, I was just looking for something different and this, this is where I came
So I’m, I’m thankful for it, uh, and I’ve mentioned it to a number of people, that have asked me, uh, over the course of the year, and I’ve, been able to talk to a number of people that have been here
I mean, I’ve met people from, uh, South Africa, Turkey, uh, Japan, ah, Australia
They’d all come over here for treatment
So, I mean, I’ve kept in contact with a number of them
So it’s really a joy to meet some of the other people treated successfully here
So, uh, yeah, uh, uh, I just,
Maybe, uh, you know, with the, with the set way that the medical field is, resistant in change, plus there’s a big, you know there’s, uh, big monetary issue about, you know, something comes in, it’s a little bit more efficient
You know, I don’t want to get into a lot of the motives, but I’m just grateful for what
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Mmm
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uh, they’ve done here for me, so, and it’s been successful so far, so I’m thankful

I know how the resistance is, when there’s something new that comes along, and what happens, uh, there may be a monetary motive to prevent, uh, you know, the, the, I hate to say that but we’re human, and so, you know, if, if, if, somebody comes up with something that’s a better way to treat, there’s all kinds of things that the person goes through their mind and their heart to what they’re thinking about, uh, you know, it’s kind of a threatening thing to the industry because they, they’re going to lose out on it
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Yeah
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if they’re not on top of that
So, it becomes a threat in a sense, and it shouldn’t be, but that’s human nature
A lot of times human nature comes out that way and you see it in anything
You see it in the medical field
You see it in, in the real estate field
You see it in the legal field
You see it in all kinds of things to where it can get into a self-fulfilling type of thing, when something comes along, that’s very profitable
It’s not necessarily always going to get in the forefront because it’s, there’s a lot of, uh, blocks and blockades in the way to prevent that from happening
Some, some of it good and some of it bad, and that’s just because of human motives, uh, of competition, so forth
So
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Burzynski Patient Interview #1
January 2011
11:57
11/9/2012
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Critiquing David H. Gorski, MD, PhD, FACS www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/editorial-staff/david-h-gorski-md-phd-managing-editor/

Critiquing David H. Gorski, MD, PhD, FACS http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/editorial-staff/david-h-gorski-md-phd-managing-editor/

“Our only goal is to promote high standards of science in medicine”
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http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/editorial-staff/
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So proclaims Science Based Medicine . org

6/10/2013 Gorski published:
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BBC Panorama investigates Stanislaw Burzynski
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http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/bbc-panorama-investigates-stanislaw-burzynski/
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“Burzynski hasn’t published anything other than case reports, tiny case series, and unconvincing studies, mostly (at least over the last decade or so) in crappy journals not even indexed on PubMed”
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Gorski’s above statement makes me wonder if PhD’s are handed out to any hack that requests one

Burzynski has published at least 4 publications which list all of the patients and information like:
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[2] 16. 2003
(Pgs. 95-96) data charts
(Pg. 95)

Case
Sex
Age
Date of initial diagnosis
Tumor histology
Tumour location
Tumour size
Previous therapies
Karnofsky performance status
KPS baseline
Date of recurrence
(Pg. 96)
Start date
Stop date
Days on treatment
Dosage
Response
Status / date of death
Progression date
Survival time (weeks) from start
Time (weeks) to progression
Last contact

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[9] 17. 2004
(Pgs. 316 + 318-321) data charts
(Pg. 316)

Gender
Age
Tumour histology
Tumour size (total of measured lesions)
Previous therapies
Karnofsky performance status
(Pg. 318)
Case
Age at admission
Sex
Ethnicity
Date of initial diagnosis
Pathology code
Visual Pathway Glioma (VPG)
Karnofsky baseline
Previous treatment
Multicentric tumour location
(Pg. 319)
” ”
(Pg. 320)
Case
Start date
Stop date
Days on treatment
Average dosage (IV treatment / PO treatment)
(Pg. 321)
Case
Response
Maximum response date
Time to maximum response (months)
Radiological PD as of 1/03/04
Progression Free Survival (PFS) (year)
Status
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) baseline
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) follow-up
Reason for withdrawal
Survival time from diagnosis (years)

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[10] 18. 6/2005
(Pgs. 169 + 171
..172) data charts
(Pg. 169)

Gender
Tumor type
Tumor spread
Previous therapies
Age
Karnofsky performance status
(Pg. 171)
Case
Protocol
Gender
Age at Admission (years)
Ethnicity
Date of Initial Diagnosis
Tumor Type
Tumor Dissemination
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Baseline
Previous treatment
(Pg. 172)
Case
Start Date
Stop Date
Days on Treatment
Average Dosage g/kg/d (A10 / AS2-1)

Case
Response
Radiological PD
Progression Free Survival (PFS) (month)
Status
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Baseline
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Follow-up
Reason for Withdrawal
Overall Survival from Diagnosis (OSD) (month)
Overall Survival from Start (OSS) (month)

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[12] 19. 3/2006
(Pgs. 42-45) data charts
(Pg. 42)

Gender
Age
Tumor history
Tumor size at baseline
Previous therapies
Karnofsky Performance Status
(Pg. 43)
Case
Protocol
Sex
Age (years)
Date of Initial Diagnosis
Tumor Type
Tumor Dissemination
Recurrence
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Baseline
Previous Treatment
(Pg. 44)
Case
Start Date
Stop Date
Days On
Average Dosage g/kg/d (A10 / AS2-1)
(Pg. 45)
Case
Response
Radiological PD
Progression Free Survival (PFS) (months)
Status
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Baseline
Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) Follow-Up
Reason for Withdrawal
Overall Survival from Diagnosis (OSD) (month)
Overall Survival from Start of antineoplaston(OST) (month)

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Maybe Gorski should try “deconstructing” some of these, especially the ones where patients did NOT have chemotherapy or radiation therapy

I’ve even provided a handy reference list

But by George, I’m George Dubya dubious that Gorski can handle it, given his track record
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
1 – Special Exception (SE)
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[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 52)
10 – subgroup
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[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
10 – Japan
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[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
10 – children
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[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 98)
11 – Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
11 – children
4 – children Study (ST)
7 – children Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
12 – children
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[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 91)
1st 12 – Study (ST)
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[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pg. 257)
12
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[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 316)
1st 12 – children
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[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
1st 12 – children
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[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 169 + 176)
13 – children
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[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
17
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[20] 14. 6/2010 (Pg. ii95)
17
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[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pgs. 40-41 + 46)
18
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 50)
19 – children
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
19 – Japan
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
19
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
20
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[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
20
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
20
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[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
22
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[6] 3. 10/2004 (Pg. 386)
31 – Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
40
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
52 – Special Exception SE)
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
56 – Japan
——————————————————————
[6] 3. 10/2004 (Pg. 386)
60
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 52)
62
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 53)
80
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[13] 2006
30 (Pg. 173)
335 – children (Pg. 174)
1652 – adults (Pg. 174)
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
1 – evaluable Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 91)
1st 10 – evaluable Study (ST)
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 52)
10 – evaluable subgroup
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
10 – evaluable Japan
——————————————————————
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
10 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 98)
11 – evaluable Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
11 – evaluable children
4 – evaluable children Study (ST)
7 – evaluable children Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
12 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 316)
1st 12 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
1st 12 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 169 + 176)
13 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
13 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
17 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[20] 14. 6/2010 (Pg. ii95)
17 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 51)
18 – evaluable children
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pgs. 40-41 + 46)
18 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
19 – evaluable Japan
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
19 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
20 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
20 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
22 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[6] 3. 10/2004 (Pg. 386)
31 – evaluable Special Exception (SE)
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
52 – evaluable Special Exception SE)
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 55)
56 – evaluable Japan
——————————————————————
[6] 3. 10/2004 (Pg. 386)
60 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 52)
62 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pg. 53)
80 – evaluable
——————————————————————
[13] 2006
30 – evaluable (Pg. 173)
335 – children (Pg. 174)
1652 – adults (Pg. 174)
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
escalating doses of ANP intravenous injections (IV) and subsequently capsules (po)
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 91)
Patients received escalating doses of antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 by intravenous bolus injections
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 93)
Antineoplaston therapy was administered in gradually escalating doses by intermittent bolus injections 6 times a day using a portable Provider 6000 dual-channel pump (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA)
——————————————————————
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
ANP was given in escalating doses by intravenous bolus injections
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
Gradually escalating doses were administered by intermittent bolus injections 6 times a day using a portable Provider 6000 dual channel pump (Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, IL, USA)
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 40)
Antineoplastons A10 (A10I) and AS2-1 injections, were given in escalating doses by intravenous injections
——————————————————————
[20] 14. 6/2010 (Pg. ii95)
Patients received escalating doses of intravenous A10 and AS2-1 6 times daily
12 or more weeks – ANP
or
at least 4 weeks – ANP but developed progressive disease (PD)
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
Patients received escalating doses of intravenous ANP 6 times daily
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 93)
Dose escalation was necessary to prevent peritumoral oedema
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
Gradual dose escalation was necessary to prevent peritumoral oedema
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 44)
ANP was given by intravenous injections in escalating doses to prevent peritumoral oedema
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 93)
Treatment consisted of daily intravenous injections of antineoplaston A10 (300 mg / mL) and AS2-1 (80 mg / mL) through a Broviac or equivalent catheter
——————————————————————
[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pgs. 257-260)
he was admitted for administration of intravenous antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 through a subclavian venous catheter by intermittent bolus injections 6 times per day using a portable pump
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
intravenous injection of ANP
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
intravenous infusions of ANP
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
300 mg / ML – Daily intravenous injections of A10
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
80 mg / ML – Daily intravenous injections of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
administered through a subclavian venous catheter
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 315)
ANP intravenously initially and subsequently orally
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pg. 169)
intravenous infusions of 2 formulations of ANP, A10 and AS2-1
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pg. 170)
IV ANP
——————————————————————
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
ANP was given intravenously daily through a subclavian venous catheter and double channel infusion pump
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 42)
Treatment involved daily intravenous injections of A10I and AS2-1
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 42)
The injections were administered every 4 hours through a subclavian venous catheter via a dual-channel infusion pump
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)

ANP was given intravenously daily through a subclavian venous catheter and a double-channel infusion pump
——————————————————————
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
Treatment consisted of intravenous infusions of antineoplastons (ANP) A10 and AS2-1
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
ANP was administered intravenously daily through a subclavian central venous catheter by a double-channel infusion pump
——————————————————————
[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
ANP was administered intravenously daily through a subclavian venous catheter via a double-channel infusion pump
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
The patient received intravenous injections of ANP every 4 hours through a subclavian central venous catheter via a double channel infusion pump followed by PO ANP only
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
6/8/2000 – PO ANP
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
IV ANP
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
ANP was administered daily through a subclavian venous catheter via a double channel infusion pump
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
Intravenous injections were discontinued after determination of CR, PR, or stable disease (SD)
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
After discontinuation of injections, the patients continued A10 and AS2-1 in 0.5g capsules
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
7/8/2004 – discontinued
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
2/1999 – CR
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
4.3 months – median duration of administration
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
4.4 months – median duration of treatment
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
4 1/2 months – median duration of i.v. ANP
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 40)
5 months – median duration of antineoplaston administration
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
5.2 months – administered median
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
5.4 months – median duration of treatment (ST)
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
5.6 months – median duration of treatment (SE)
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)

5.7 months – average duration of ANP
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
5.7 months – median duration of treatment
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pgs. 91 + 96)
6 months – median duration of treatment
——————————————————————
[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
6.5 months – median duration of treatment
——————————————————————
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)

9.5 months – median duration of IV ANP
——————————————————————
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
9 1/2 months – median duration of administration
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pgs. 315 + 320)
16 months (1 year 4 months) average duration of intravenous ANP
——————————————————————
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
16.5 months – median
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 320)
19 months – average duration of oral ANP
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 168 + 170)
20 months (1 year 8 months) administered average duration
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
28.6 months – median duration of po ANP
After obtaining at least minor response (SD), the treatment continued with po ANP
——————————————————————
[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pg. 257)
655 consecutive days – administration of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 with the exception of a few short interruptions
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
5.69 g/kg/day – median average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
5.8 g/kg/day – median average dosages of A10
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
6.0 g/kg/day – median average dosages of A10
——————————————————————
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
6.37 g/kg/day – average dosage of Antineoplaston A10
——————————————————————
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
7.95 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pgs. 315 + 320)
7.95 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
8.36 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
9.0 g/kg/day – median of average dosages of A10 (ST)
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
9.2 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 40)
9.22 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10I
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
9.4 g/kg/d – median of average dosages of A10
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
9.4 g/kg/day – median of average dosages of A10 (SE)
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 168 + 170)
10.30 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
10.6 g/kg/d – median of average dosages of A10
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 91)
11.3 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
12.16 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10
======================================
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
5.3-16.1 g/kg/day – dosage of A10
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
0.28 g/kg/d – average dosage of A10 and AS2-1
After obtaining at least minor response (SD), the treatment continued with po ANP
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 320)
0.28 g/kg/day – average dosage of A10 and AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pg. 257)
8.15 g/kg/d – maximum dosage of A10
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
11.3 g/kg/day – average maximum dosage of A10
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 42)
13.37 g/kg/day – maximum dosage of A10I (SD = 7.36 g/kg/day)
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 93)
20 g/kg/day – highest tolerated or effective dosage of A10 not exceeding
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
331.4 kg – maximum total dose of A10
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
0.24 g/kg/day – average dosage of Antineoplaston AS2-1
——————————————————————
[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
0.24 g/kg/day – median average dosages of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
0.28 g/kg/day – median average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
0.3 g/kg/day – median of average dosages of AS2-1 (ST and SE)
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
0.3 g/kg/day – median average dosages of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 40)
0.31 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
0.32 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pgs. 315 + 320)
0.33 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
0.34 g/kg/d – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
0.37 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 168 + 170)
0.38 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 91)
0.4 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
0.4 g/kg/d – median of average dosages of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
0.4 g/kg/d – median of average dosages of AS2-1
——————————————————————
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
0.41 g/kg/day – average dosage of AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
0.2-0.6 g/kg/day – dosage of AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pg. 257)
0.35 g/kg/d – maximum dosage of
AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
0.4 g/kg/day – average maximum dosage of AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 93)
0.4 g/kg/day – highest tolerated or effective dosage of AS2-1 not exceeding
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 42)
0.49 g/kg/day – maximum dosage of AS2-1 (SD = 0.26 g/kg/day)
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
23.9 kg – maximum total dose of AS2-1
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
1 / 9% – nonevaluable due to only 4 weeks of treatment and lack of follow-up scans
This patient died while on treatment due to a brain infarct and was counted as a treatment failure
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
1 – nonevaluable
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004
1 – nonevaluable due to only receiving 4 weeks of ANP and no follow-up scans
This patient died while receiving ANP due to a nonhemorrhaging brain infarction and was considered a treatment failure (Pg. 320)
(only 4 weeks after initiation of ANP Pg. 321)
(There was no evidence that these were treatment related deaths Pg. 321)
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
Patient 2 unable to be evaluated because didn’t have follow-up MRI to determine response
——————————————————————
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 96)
Patient 11 unable to be evaluated because died of intratumoral hemorrhage and her duration of treatment was too short to short for evaluation of response
——————————————————————
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
2 – nonevaluable due to lack of follow-up scans
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
3 Special Exception (SE) – nonevaluable
——————————————————————
[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
7 – couldn’t be evaluated due to an inadequate duration of treatment and lack of follow-up magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans
——————————————————————
[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
12 – not evaluable due to too short a duration of treatment and lack of follow-up MRIs
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 97)
4 – died from the tumour
4 – died from aspiration pneumonia
2 – intratumoral bleeding
——————————————————————
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
One CR patient developed recurrence after premature discontinuation of ANP and obtained a 2nd CR after ANP was restarted
This patient who initially had multiple metastases to the brain and spinal cord died due to aspiration pneumonia and was confirmed by autopsy as disease free
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004
1 patient who had stable disease discontinued ANP against medical advice and died 4.5 years later (Pgs. 315 + 320)
(There was no evidence that these were treatment related deaths Pg. 321)
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005
1 patient passed away after 6 years, 10 months from the start of the treatment (3 years after discontinuation of ANP)
The cause of death was recurrent pneumonia, possibly due (Pg. 170)
to chronic immunosuppression from chemotherapy administered prior to ANP (patient 1) (Pg. 172)
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 45)
The deaths of 12 patients were most likely tumor related
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 45)
There was a single death due to a pulmonary embolism
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pg. 45)
2 cases of death possibly resulting from aspiration pneumonia
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 97)
The 2 surviving patients weren’t previously treated with chemotherapy and radiation therapy and didn’t develop pneumonia or intratumoral bleeding
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pg. 169)
6 hadn’t received prior chemotherapy or radiation
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pg. 175)
6 long-term
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pgs. 40-41)
6 – didn’t have radiation therapy or chemotherapy
——————————————————————
[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
No patients received radiation or chemotherapy before starting ANP, but 6 patients underwent surgery and 14 had biopsy only
——————————————————————
[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
The tumor was inoperable
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003
Patient 3 (Pg. 95)
Patient 8 (Pg. 95)
Case 10 (Pgs. 96-97)
——————————————————————
[3] 1. 3/2004
Case Study, Patient 1 (Pgs. 50-51)
Case Study, Patient 2 (Pgs. 51-52)
Case Study, Patient 3 (Pgs. 53-54)
Case Study, Patient 4 (Pg. 54)
Case Study, Patient 5 (Pg. 55)
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004
Case 8 (Pgs. 321-322)
Case 10 (Pgs. 321 + 323)
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 172-173)
Patient 4
——————————————————————
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 173-174)
Patient 11
——————————————————————
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pgs. 45-46)
Case Report Patient 12
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[2] 16. 2003 (Pg. 94)
Trial design – Fleming
——————————————————————
[9] 17. 2004 (Pg. 317)
Trial design – Fleming
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
======================================
Gorski has claimed:
======================================
6/7/2013 “Unlike Mr. Merola, I am indeed very concerned with getting my facts correct”
——————————————————————
http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2013/06/07/i-want-my-anp/
======================================
6/5/2013 “ … I do know cancer science”
——————————————————————
http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2013/06/05/odds-and-ends-about-burzynski-clinic/
======================================
11/2/2012 “Personally, having pored over Burzynski’s publications … “
——————————————————————
http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2012/11/02/stanislaw-burzynski-fails-to-save-another-patient/
======================================
5/8/2013 “I’ve searched Burzynski’s publications … “
——————————————————————
http://scienceblogs.com/insolence/2013/05/08/eric-merola-and-stanislaw-burzynskis-secret-weapon-against-the-skeptics-fabio-lanzoni-part-2/
======================================
☆AnthonyJeselnik☆
🚫GorskonOrac🚫
You tweeted 12:44pm-3/30/13📄

——————————————————————
David Gorski (@gorskon) tweeted at 12:44pm – 30 Mar 13:

——————————————————————
Defend your tweet😅
#Burzynski—
(@FauxSkeptic) May 23, 2013

——————————————————————
David Gorski (@gorskon)
5/23/13, 9:32 AM

——————————————————————
@FauxSkeptic No need to defend my Tweet. The defense is in the link.
http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/index.php/stanislaw-burzynski-bad-medicine-a-bad-movie
——————————————————————
NO, Dr. Gorski, you have NOT “deconstructed his “evidence” in depth before”
Burzynski: Cancer Is Serious Business (Part I) consists of the documentary; as well as the documents on the movie web-site, which you have NOT “deconstructed … in depth before”

(What Gorski did is termed: “cherry-picking”)

Maybe #ScienceBasedMedicine needs to change this
——————————————————————
“Our only goal is to promote high standards of science in medicine”
======================================
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
References:
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/scientific-publications.html
� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �
[1] 1. 10/2003 (Pg. 358)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in children with recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma
A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/970.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2003; 5: 358
Volume 5 Issue 4 October 2003
======================================
[2] 16. 2003 (Pgs. 91-101)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials
BT-11 – BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
Special exception (SE) to BT-11
DRUGS IN R&D
Phase II study of antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in patients with recurrent diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma:
a preliminary report
recurrent diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma
Drugs in R and D
(Drugs in Research and Development)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12718563
Drugs In R and D / Drugs in Research and Development:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12718563
Drugs R D. 2003;4(2):91-101
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/960.pdf
Drugs in R&D 2003;4:91-101
======================================
[3] 1. 3/2004 (Pgs. 47-58)
——————————————————————
Review Articles on Clinical Trials:
INTEGRATIVE CANCER THERAPIES
The Present State of Antineoplaston Research
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/994.pdf
Integrative Cancer Therapies 2004;3:47-58
Volume 3, No. 1, March 2004
DOI: 10.1177/1534735-403261964
======================================
[4] 4. 9/2004 (Pgs. 257-261)
——————————————————————
Case Reports:
INTEGRATIVE CANCER THERAPIES
Special exception (SE) to BT-11 BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
Long-term survival and complete response of a patient with recurrent diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioblastoma multiforme
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1145.pdf
Integrative Cancer Therapies 2004;3:257-261
Volume 3, Number 3 September 2004
======================================
[5] 2. 10/2004 (Pg. 384)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
BT-20 Patients With GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM)
Phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1218.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 384
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Society for Neuro-Oncology Ninth Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, November 18-21, 2004
======================================
[6] 3. 10/2004 (Pg. 386)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
(DBSG) (Study (ST) and Special Exception (SE))
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Long-term survivals in phase II studies of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in patients with diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1219.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 386
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
======================================
[7] 4. 10/2004 (Pg. 427)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
(AT/RT of CNS) (Study (ST) and Special Exception (SE))
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
BT-14 CHILDREN WITH RHABDOID TUMOR OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
Phase II studies of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in children with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) of the central nervous system
A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1146.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 427
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Eleventh International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts, June 13-16, 2004
======================================
[8] 5. 10/2004 (Pg. 428)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
BT-12 CHILDREN WITH PRIMITIVE NEUROECTODERMAL TUMORS (PNET)
Treatment of primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNET) with antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP)
Preliminary results of phase II studies
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1147.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 428
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Eleventh International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology
======================================
[9] 17. 2004 (Pgs. 315-326)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
DRUGS IN R&D
Drugs in R and D
(Drugs in Research and Development)
Pg. 317
BT-13 – children with low-grade astrocytoma
BT-23 – children with visual pathway gliomas
Phase II study of antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in children with recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma
A Preliminary Report
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15563234
Drugs R&D 2004;5(6):315-326
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15563234
Drugs R D. 2004;5(6):315-26
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1194.pdf
======================================
[10] 18. 6/2005 (Pgs. 168-177)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
INTEGRATIVE CANCER THERAPIES
BT-12 children with PRIMITIVE NEUROECTODERMAL TUMORS (PNET)
CAN-01 (CAN-1) PATIENTS WITH REFRACTORY MALIGNANCIES
Long-term survival of high-risk pediatric patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumors treated with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15911929
Integrative Cancer Therapies 2005;4(2):168-177
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15911929
Integr Cancer Ther. 2005 Jun;4(2):168-77
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1220.pdf
DOI: 10.1177/1534735405276835
http://m.ict.sagepub.com/content/4/2/168.long?view=long&pmid=15911929
Volume 4 Number 2 June 2005
======================================
[11] 7. 7/2005 (Pg. 300)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
BT-11 BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
Targeted therapy with ANP in children less than 4 years old with inoperable brain stem gliomas. Neuro-Oncology. 2005; 7:300
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1224.pdf
Volume 7 Issue 3 July 2005
Abstracts from the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology Meeting
======================================
[12] 19. 3/2006 (Pgs. 40-47)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
BT-03

BT-11 BRAIN STEM GLIOMA (BSG)
BT-18
6. MIXED GLIOMA
ADULT PATIENTS WITH MIXED GLIOMA
“mixed glioma”, a type of primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT)
BT-22
8. CHILDREN WITH PRIMARY MALIGNANT BRAIN TUMORS
CAN-01 (CAN-1)
PATIENTS WITH REFRACTORY MALIGNANCIES
Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Weaver, R.A., Burzynski, B. Targeted therapy with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 of high grade, recurrent, and progressive brainstem glioma. Integrative Cancer Therapies 2006;5(1):40-47
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16484713
Integr Cancer Ther. 2006 Mar;5(1):40-7
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16484713
DOI: 10.1177/1534735405285380
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/5825.pdf

http://m.ict.sagepub.com/content/5/1/40.long?view=long&pmid=16484713
======================================
[13] 2006 (Pgs. 167-168)
——————————————————————
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1252.pdf
======================================
[14] 8. 10/2006 (Pg. 466)
——————————————————————
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
BT-11 BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
Treatment of multicentric brainstem gliomas with antineoplastons (ANP) A10 and AS2-1. Neuro-Oncology. 2006; 8:466
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/2105.pdf
Volume 8 Issue 4 October 2006
Abstracts for the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO)
======================================
[15] 10. 6/2008 (Pg. 450)
——————————————————————
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Interim Reports on Clinical Trials:
(OPG)
BT-23 – CHILDREN WITH VISUAL PATHWAY GLIOMA
Phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in children with optic pathway glioma:
A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/7287.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2008; 10:450
Volume 10 Issue 3 June 2008
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[16] 10/2008 (Pg. 821)
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NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in patients with newly diagnosed anaplastic astrocytoma:
A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/7853.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2008; 10:821
Volume 10 Issue 5 October 2008
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[17] 12/2008 (Pg. 1067)
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NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 infusions (ANP) in patients with recurrent anaplastic astrocytoma
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/7898.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2008; 10:1067
Volume 10 Issue 6 December 2008
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[18] 12/2009 (Pg. 923)
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Case Reports:
NEURO-ONCOLOGY
Over a 10-year survival and complete response of a patient with diffuse intrinsic brainstem glioma (DBSG) treated with antineoplastons (ANP)
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/8638.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2009; 11:923
Volume 11 Issue 6 December 2009
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[19] 13. 12/2009 (Pg. 951)
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Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:
BT-11 BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
(Study (ST) and Special Exception (SE))
Phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with brainstem glioma
Protocol BC-BT-11
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/8639.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2009, 11:951.
Volume 11 Issue 6 December 2009
Abstracts from the Third Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology (WFNO) and the Sixth Meeting of the Asian Society for Neuro-Oncology (ASNO), May 11-14, 2009, Yokohama, Japan
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[20] 14. 6/2010 (Pg. ii95)
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Interim Reports on Clinical Trials:
BT-13 – CHILDREN WITH LOW GRADE ASTROCYTOMA
A Phase II Study of Antineoplaston A-10 and AS-1 Injections in children with low-grade astrocytomas
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/8397.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2010; 12, ii95.
Volume 12 Issue 6 June 2010
Antineoplaston A10 (Atengenal)
Antineoplaston AS2-1 (Astugenal)
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[21] 15. 11/2010 (Pg. iv72)
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Interim Reports on Clinical Trials:
BT-18 – ADULT PATIENTS WITH MIXED GLIOMA
Preliminary Results of a Phase II Study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in Adult Patients with Recurrent Mixed Gliomas
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/8637.pdf
Neuro-Oncology 2010; 12:iv72.
Volume 12 Supplement 4 November 2010
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