All’s fair in Drugs and War

======================================
GlaxoSmithKline
======================================
$3 BILLION
——————————————————————
7/2/2012
——————————————————————
(4/1998 – 8/2003)
——————————————————————
United States alleges GSK participated in
preparing
publishing
distributing

misleading medical journal article that misreported that clinical trial of drug demonstrated efficacy in treatment when study failed to demonstrate efficacy
——————————————————————
At same time, United States alleges, GSK didn’t make available data from 2 other studies in which drug also failed to demonstrate efficacy
——————————————————————
(2001 – 2007)
——————————————————————
United States alleges GSK failed to include certain safety data about drug in reports to FDA meant to allow FDA to determine if drug continues to be safe for approved indications and to spot drug safety trends
——————————————————————
missing information included data regarding certain post-marketing studies
——————————————————————
data regarding 2 studies undertaken in response to European regulators’ concerns about safety of drug
——————————————————————
United States alleges GSK stated drug had positive cholesterol profile despite having no well-controlled studies to support that message
======================================

======================================
Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and subsidiaries, Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. and Scios Inc.
Janssen Pharmaceutica Products, L.P.
======================================
$2.2 BILLION +
——————————————————————
11/4/2013, Monday
——————————————————————
Johnson & Johnson (J&J) and Janssen
——————————————————————
complaint alleges J&J and Janssen were aware drug posed serious health risks, but companies downplayed these risks
——————————————————————
For example, when J&J study of drug showed significant risk of strokes and other adverse events in patients, complaint alleges Janssen combined study data with other studies to make it appear there was lower overall risk of adverse events
——————————————————————
year after J&J received results of 2nd study confirming increased safety risk for patients taking drug, but hadn’t published data, one physician who worked on study cautioned Janssen
——————————————————————
“[a]t this point, so long after [the study] has been completedwe must be concerned that this gives the strong appearance that Janssen is purposely withholding the findings.”
——————————————————————
complaint alleges Janssen knew patients taking drug had increased risk, but nonetheless promoted drug as “uncompromised by safety concerns
——————————————————————
When Janssen received initial results of studies indicating drug posed same risk as other antipsychotics, complaint alleges company retained outside consultants to re-analyze study results and ultimately published articles stating drug was actually associated with lower risk
——————————————————————
J&J and another of its subsidiaries, Scios Inc.
——————————————————————
8/2001 – FDA approved drug to treat patients with acutely decompensated congestive heart failure who have shortness of breath at rest or with minimal activity
——————————————————————
approval based on study involving hospitalized patients experiencing severe heart failure who received infusions of drug over average 36-hour period
——————————————————————
complaint alleged Scios had no sound scientific evidence supporting medical necessity of outpatient infusions and misleadingly used small pilot study to encourage serial outpatient use of drug
======================================

======================================
Abbott Laboratories Inc.
======================================
$1.5 BILLION
——————————————————————
5/7/2012, Monday
——————————————————————
(2001 – 2006)
——————————————————————
company marketed drug in combination with atypical antipsychotic drugs even after its clinical trials failed to demonstrate adding drug was any more effective than atypical antipsychotic alone for that use
——————————————————————
1999 – forced to discontinue clinical trial of drug due to increased incidence of adverse events, including
somnolence
dehydration
anorexia
experienced by study participants administered drug
——————————————————————
funded 2 studies of use of drug
both failed to meet main goals established for the study
——————————————————————
When 2nd study failed to show statistically significant treatment difference between antipsychotic drugs used in combination with drug and antipsychotic drugs alone, waited nearly 2 years to notify sales force about study results and another 2 years to publish results
======================================

======================================
AstraZeneca LP / AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals LP
======================================
$520 MILLION
——————————————————————
4/27/2010, Tuesday
——————————————————————
engaged doctors to conduct studies on unapproved uses of drug
——————————————————————
recruited doctors to serve as authors of articles that were ghostwritten by medical literature companies and about studies doctors in question didn’t conduct
——————————————————————
then used
studies
articles

as basis for promotional messages about unapproved uses of drug
======================================
REFERENCE:
======================================
11/26/2013 – United States Department of Justice (DOJ) versus BIG Pharma: BIG Pharma fought the law, and the law won ?:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/26/united-states-department-of-justice-versus-big-pharma-big-pharma-fought-the-law-and-the-law-won/
======================================

Cancer: Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S., National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2005-2012 (2002-2010)

——————————————————————
Source: Vital Statistics of the United States, NCHS
======================================
Cancer (2nd) – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S. Per 100,000
——————————————————————
2010☝186.2 (2012)
2008👇186 (2011)
2007☝ 186.6 (2010)
2007*👇185.7 (2009)
2006*👇187.1 (2008)
2005*☝188.7 (2007)
2004👇168.6 (2006)
2003☝189.3 (2005)
======================================
Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S.: Cancer
——————————————————————
BlackPercent of All Deaths
——————————————————————
2010☝23% (2nd highest, behind heart: 24.1%) (2012)
2008 – 22.1% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 24.5%) (2011)
2007☝22.1% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 24.6%) (2010)
2006☝21.75% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 24.92%) (2009)
2005👇21.6% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 25.3%) (2008)
2004☝21.8% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 25.8%) (2007)
2003☝21.5% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 26.6%) (2006)
2002☝21% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 27%) (2005)
——————————————————————
HispanicPercent of All Deaths
——————————————————————
2010☝21.5% – (highest) (2012)
2008👇20.7% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 20.8%) (2011)
2007☝20.8% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 21.8%) (2010)
2006☝20.02% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 21.74%) (2009)
2005👇19.9% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 22.5%) (2008)
2004☝20% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 22.7%) (2007)
2003 – 19.7% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 23.2%) (2006)
2002☝19.7% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 23.9%) (2005)
——————————————————————
Asian*Percent of All Deaths – * Includes deaths among individuals of Asian extraction and Asian-Pacific Islanders
——————————————————————
2010👇27.70% – (highest) (2012)
2008☝28.7% (
highest, before heart: 24.8%) (2011)
2007☝27.6% (
highest, before heart: 23.6%) (2010)
2006☝26.36% (
highest, before heart: 23.87%) (2009)
2005👇25.7% (
highest, before heart: 24.2%) (2008)
2004☝26.8% (
highest, before heart: 24.6%) (2007)
2003☝26.2% (
highest, before heart: 25.3%) (2006)
2002☝25.4% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 26.4%) (2005)
——————————————————————
American Indian**Percent of All Deaths – ** Includes deaths among Aleuts and Eskimos
American Indian/Alaska Native
——————————————————————
2010☝19% – (highest) (2012)
2008☝18.5 (
highest, before heart: 18.%) (2011)
2007☝18.2% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 18.9%) (2010)
2006👇17.43% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 19.49%) (2009)
2005👇17.7% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 19.1%) (2008)
2004☝18.2% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 19.8%) (2007)
2003👇16.4% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 20.6%) (2006)
2002☝18% (
2nd highest, behind heart: 20.1%) (2005)
======================================
REFERENCES:
======================================
2010 (2012):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factpdf.htm
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/toc.htm
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/FactBook2012.pdf
——————————————————————
2010 – Black (2012):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2010 – Hispanic (2012):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/chapter4data.htm#gr9-122
——————————————————————
2010 – Asian/Pacific Islander (2012):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2010 – American Indian/Alaska Native (2012):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
======================================
2005-2011 Archive (2002-2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factpdf_archive.htm
======================================
2011 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book Archive (2008-2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/FactBook_2011.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers)
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2008 – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S. (2011):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2008 – Black (2011):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2008 – Hispanic (2011):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4data.htm#gr9-122
——————————————————————
2008 – Asian (2011):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2008 – American Indian (2011):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-11/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
======================================
2010 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2007-2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/FactBook_2010.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers)
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2007 – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S. (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2007 (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2007 – Black (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2007 – Hispanic (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr9-122
——————————————————————
2007 – Asian (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2007 – American Indian (2010):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-10/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
======================================
2009 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2006-2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/FactBook2009_final.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2007* – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S., *Data for 2007 are preliminary (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2006 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
2006 – Black (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2006 – Hispanic (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4data.htm#gr9-122
——————————————————————
2006 – Asian (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2006 – American Indian (2009):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-09/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
======================================
2008 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2005-2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/FactBookFinal.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2006* – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S., *Data for 2006 are preliminary (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2005 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
2005 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
2005 – Black (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2005 – Hispanic (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4data.htm#gr9-122
——————————————————————
2005 – Asian (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2005 – American Indian (2008):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-08/chapter4.htm
======================================
2007 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2004-2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/07factbk.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2005* – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S., *Data for 2005 are preliminary (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2004 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
2004 – Black (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4data.htm#gr9-121
——————————————————————
2004 – Hispanic (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4.htm#gr9-124
——————————————————————
2004 – Asian (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4data.htm#gr9-123
——————————————————————
2004 – American Indian (2007):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-07/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
======================================
2006 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2003-2004):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/06factbk.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2004 – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S. (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2003 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2003 – Black (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2003 – Hispanic (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2003 – Asian (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2003 – American Indian (2006):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-06/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
======================================
2005 – Fiscal Year – NHLBI Fact Book (2002-2003):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4.htm
——————————————————————
PDF:
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/05factbk.pdf
——————————————————————
HTML/Web Version (Accessible version, recommended for screen readers):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/toc.htm
——————————————————————
2003 – Leading Causes of Death: Death Rates, U.S. (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr8
——————————————————————
2002 – Leading Causes of Death Among Minority Groups, U.S. (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2002 – Black (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2002 – Hispanic (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
——————————————————————
2002 – Asian (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr9-124
——————————————————————
2002 – American Indian (2005):
——————————————————————
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factbook-05/chapter4data.htm#gr9-12
======================================

Count de Money: What Are the Costs of Cancer ? (American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures 2002-2013)

======================================
What Are the Costs of Cancer?
——————————————————————
National Institutes of Health (NIH) estimates:
——————————————————————
overall costs of cancer:
——————————————————————
2010 – $263.8 billion (2011)
2010☝$263.8 billion (2010)

2008👇$201.5 billion (2013)
2008☝$228.1 billion (2009)
2007☝$226.8 billion (2012)
2007☝$219.2 billion (2008)

2006👇$206.3 billion (2007)
2005☝$209.9 billion (2006)
2004☝$189.8 billion (2005)
2003☝$189.5 billion (2004)
2002☝$171.6 billion (2003)
2001☝$156.7 billion (2002)

——————————————————————
direct medical costs
(total of all health expenditures)
——————————————————————
2010 – $102.8 billion (2011)
2010☝$102.8 billion (2010)

2008👇$77.4 billion (2013)
2008👇$93.2 billion (2009)
2007☝$103.8 billion (2012)
2007☝$89.0 billion (2008)
2006☝$78.2 billion (2007)
2005☝$74.0 billion (2006)
2004☝$69.4 billion (2005)
2003☝$64.2 billion (2004)
2002☝$60.9 billion (2003)
2001☝$56.4 billion (2002)

——————————————————————
2008-2011 – indirect morbidity costs
(cost of lost productivity due to illness)
——————————————————————
2010 – $20.9 billion (2011)
2010☝$20.9 billion (2010)
2008☝$18.8 billion (2009)
2007☝$18.2 billion (2008)
2006☝$17.9 billion (2007)
2005☝$17.5 billion (2006)
2004☝$16.9 billion (2005)
2003☝$16.3 billion (2004)

2002👇$15.5 billion (2003)
2001☝$15.6 billion (2002)
——————————————————————
indirect mortality costs
(cost of lost productivity due to premature death)
——————————————————————
2010 – $140.1 billion (2011)
2010☝$140.1 billion (2010)
2008☝$124.0 billion (2013)

2008👇$116.1 billion (2009)
2007☝$123.0 billion (2012)
2007☝$112.0 billion (2008)

2006👇$110.2 billion (2007)
2005☝$118.4 billion (2006)
2004👇$103.5 billion (2005)
2003☝$109 billion (2004)
2002☝$95.2 billion (2003)
2001☝$84.7 billion (2002)

——————————————————————
According to US Census Bureau:
——————————————————————
Americans uninsured
2012-2013 had no health insurance coverage
——————————————————————
2010👇approximately 50 million (2013)
2009 – almost 51 million (2012)
2009☝almost 51 million (2011)
2008☝46 million (2010)
——————————————————————
2008 – approximately 28% aged 18 to 34 years (2010)
——————————————————————
2010👇almost one-third of Hispanics (31%) (2013)
2009 – almost one-third of Hispanics (32%) (2012)
2009☝almost one­-third of Hispanics (32%) (2011)
——————————————————————
2011-2012 (17 years of age and younger)
2010-2012had no health insurance coverage
——————————————————————
2010 – one in 10 children (2013)
2009 – one in 10 children (2012)
2009 – one in 10 children (2011)
2008 – 10% of children (2010)
——————————————————————
2012-2013 PLEASE NOTE:

These numbers are not comparable to those published in previous years as of 2011, NIH calculating estimates using different data source:

2012 – NIH is using a different data source:

2012-2013 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS) of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

2012-2013 MEPS estimates based on more current, nationally representative data used extensively in scientific publications

2012-2013 direct and indirect costs will no longer be projected to current year, estimates of indirect morbidity costs discontinued

2012-2013 For more information, please visit nhlbi.nih.gov/about/factpdf.htm.
——————————————————————
Lack of health insurance and other barriers prevents many Americans from receiving optimal health care
——————————————————————
2008 – early release estimates from National Health Interview Survey (2009)
2006 – early release estimates from the National Health Interview Survey (2008)
2004National Health Interview Survey data (2007)
2003National Health Interview Survey data (2006)
——————————————————————
2008 – about 24% aged 18 to 64 years (2009)
2006☝about 24% aged 18-64 (2008)
2004 – about 17% younger than age 65 had no health insurance coverage (2007)
2003☝about 17% younger than age 65 have no health insurance coverage (2006)
——————————————————————
2004 – 27% 65 and older had Medicare coverage only (2007)
2003☝24% 65 and older have Medicare coverage only (2006)
——————————————————————
2008 – 13% of children had no health insurance coverage for at least part of past year (2009)
2006☝13% of children had no health insurance coverage for at least part of past year (2008)
——————————————————————
2008 – More than 36% of adults who lack high school diploma were uninsured in past year (2009)
2006☝Almost 34% of adults who lack high school diploma were uninsured in past year (2008)
——————————————————————
2008 – 23% of high school graduates (2009)
2006☝23% of high school graduates (2008)
——————————————————————
2008👇14% of those with more than high school education (2009)
2006 – 15% of those with more than high school education (2008)
——————————————————————
2008 – Lack of health insurance is not only a concern of unemployed; almost one-quarter of employed individuals (aged 18 to 64 years) were uninsured sometime during past year (2009)
——————————————————————
2004 – Persons in lowest income group 10 times as likely as persons in highest income group not to receive needed medical care because of cost (2007)
——————————————————————
2004 – Almost 16 million citizens (6%) were unable to obtain needed medical care due to cost (2007)
——————————————————————
2003 – In survey, nearly 20% aged 18-44 years reported not having usual place to go for medical care (2006)
——————————————————————
2010-2013 – Uninsured patients and ethnic minorities substantially more likely to be diagnosed with cancer at later stage, when treatment can be more extensive and more costly
——————————————————————
2012-2013 – For more information on relationship between health insurance and cancer, see Cancer Facts & Figures 2008, Special Section, available online at cancer.org/statistics.
2010 – cancer.org.
2009 – (5008.08), Special Section, available online at cancer.org.
2008 – see special section page 22

20131122-005657.jpg

20131122-005720.jpg

20131122-005738.jpg

20131122-005752.jpg
======================================
REFERENCES:
======================================
2013:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-036845.pdf
======================================
2012:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-031941.pdf
======================================
2011:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-029771.pdf
======================================
2010:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/acspc-024113.pdf
======================================
2009:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/500809webpdf.pdf
======================================
2008:
——————————————————————
http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/pdf/worldcancer.pdf
=====================================
2007:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2007pwsecuredpdf.pdf
======================================
2006:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2006pwsecuredpdf.pdf
======================================
2005:
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2005f4pwsecuredpdf.pdf
======================================
2004:
——————————————————————
http://www.pink-ribbon-pins.com/CancerRates2004.pdf
======================================
2003:
——————————————————————
http://www.whyquit.com/studies/2003_ACS_Cancer_Facts.pdf
======================================
2002:
——————————————————————
http://www.uhmsi.com/docs/CancerFacts&Figures2002.pdf
======================================

Critiquing: Families run out of hope, money after cancer treatments (USA TODAY NEWS, NATION, Liz Szabo, USA TODAY)

USA TODAY
Liz Szabo
Michael Stravato
Jerry Mosemak
Robert Hanashiro

Before you write a Hack Piece
Check Your Facts Please

——————————————————————

20131118-084404.jpg
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The 3rd, and thankfully final segment of USA TODAY’s “hit-piece” of irresponsible yellow journalism about Dr. Stanislaw R. Burzynski [1], contains the following:
——————————————————————
“Patients stay in hotels while visiting him”
——————————————————————
Pete Cohen made this movie about his and
Hannah Bradley’s trip to the Burzynski Clinic

It does NOT look like they stayed in a hotel [2]
——————————————————————
The article continues:
——————————————————————
“If children deteriorate, they often end up in the closest emergency room, said physician Jeanine Graf, director of the pediatric intensive care unit at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston, who says she has treated at least a dozen of Burzynski’s patients
——————————————————————
In the 2nd segment of USA TODAY’s yellow journalism “hit-piece,” the reader was advised that Burzynski had treated [3]:
——————————————————————
“ . . . more than 8,000 patients since 1977.”
——————————————————————
Physician Jeanine Graf, “says she has treated at least a dozen of Burzynski’smore than 8,000 patients,”

This means that Dr. Graf has treated LESS THAN 0.15% of Burzynski’s patients
——————————————————————
The article indicates that:
——————————————————————
“Typically, Graf sees Burzynski’s patients after they have become unresponsive, unable to open their eyes or breathe on their own”

“Graf says she’s never seen Burzynski attending to them”
——————————————————————
Why would she ?

Does she ride in the ambulance to and from the clinic ?

As the article makes clear:

“While Burzynski often meets patients on their first trip to the clinic, Jaffe said he is

“not the treating physician of the clinic’s patients”

“The doctors on Burzynski’s staff have admitting privileges at local hospitals and “attend to patients as needed,” Jaffe said”
——————————————————————
And she continues:
——————————————————————
“And describing her personal experience with Burzynski’s patients, Graf says,”

“I’ve never seen one survive long-term.”
——————————————————————
Are we supposed to believe that pediatric physician Jeanine Graf keeps track of the “more than 8,000 patients” that the article claims Burzynski has treated ?
——————————————————————
Continuing on, the article also claims:
——————————————————————
“The unlucky ones end up broke, spending everything on medicine, airfare, hotel rooms and meals while in Houston, Graf says

“Burzynski’s attorney, Richard Jaffe, notes that all cancer care is expensive”

“I think the clinic’s policies are a lot more charitable than the big institutions,” Jaffe says”
——————————————————————
6/25/2013 – Medical Bills Are the Biggest Cause of US Bankruptcies [4]

“Bankruptcies resulting from unpaid medical bills will affect nearly 2 million people this year—making health care the No. 1 cause of such filings . . . according to new data”

“. . . estimates that households containing 1.7 million people will file for bankruptcy protection this year

“Even outside of bankruptcy, about 56 million adultsmore than 20 percent of the population between the ages of 19 and 64—will still struggle with health-care-related bills this year . . .”

“Despite the anticipated 2013 dip, such bankruptcies represent about three out of every five filings
——————————————————————
2007 – How Many Americans Go Bankrupt Due to Medical Purposes Each Year? [5]

“2007, a Harvard study shows that at least 60% of bankruptcies are related to medical bills

“Even people with health insurance are filing bankruptcy”

“Insurance premiums, deductibles, co-pay, and out of pocket expenses cause medical bills to drown individuals and families in medical debt”

“Harvard also discovered that 75% of those filing bankruptcy for medical reasons had health insurance

“It is clear that having health insurance is no guarantee against carrying debt related to health care”
——————————————————————
Burzynski has treated more than 8,000 patients since 1977

8,000 divided by 36 years equals an average of:

222 patients per year

Burzynski is obviously NOT the problem
——————————————————————
Liz Szabo, Michael Stravato, Jerry Mosemak, and Robert Hanashiro

Don’t quit your day jobs

USA TODAY needs to generate readership somehow !!!
——————————————————————
Sarcasm . . . deal with it
======================================
REFERENCES:
======================================
[1] – 11/15/2013
——————————————————————
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/15/jeanine-graf-cancer-children/2994675/
======================================
[2]Hannah’s Anectdote:
——————————————————————

======================================
[3] – 11/16/2013 – Critiquing: Doctor accused of selling false hope to families (USA TODAY NEWS, NATION, Liz Szabo, USA TODAY):
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/16/httpwww-usatoday-comstorynewsnation20131115stanislaw-burzynski-cancer-controversy2994561/
======================================
[4] – 06/25/13 2:29 PM ET—By CNBC’s Dan Mangan @danpostman
——————————————————————
http://www.cnbc.com/id/100840148
======================================
[5] – 2007 – Written by James Hirby | Fact checked by The Law Dictionary staff
——————————————————————
http://thelawdictionary.org/article/how-many-americans-go-bankrupt-due-to-medical-purposes-each-year/
======================================

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Critiquing: Doctor accused of selling false hope to families (USA TODAY NEWS, NATION, Liz Szabo, USA TODAY)

20131116-002847.jpg
I gave Liz Szabo and USA TODAY the chance to act like a Spike Lee joint and “Do the Right Thing”, the same day their article came out [1]

I gave them the opportunity to prove that their article was a legitimate piece of journalism with some semblance of integrity, and NOT just akin to one of “The Skeptics™ phoned-in “rubber-stamped” yellow journalism hit pieces

Instead, it seems that Liz Szabo and / or USA TODAY decided to act as if they had rolled a Spike Lee joint

I sent an e-mail with 2 editorial corrections, and only one (correcting Lisa Merritt’s comment
link from taking the reader to the 1999 Mayo Clinic report instead of to her comments), was corrected [2]

The 2nd correction which they #FAILED to do, earns them well deserved INSOLENCE
——————————————————————
The article claims:
——————————————————————
Burzynski, 70, calls his drugs “antineoplastons” and says he has given them to more than 8,000 patients since 1977.”
——————————————————————

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——————————————————————
However, if you select the “8,000 patients” link, the referenced page does NOT indicate that at all [2]
——————————————————————

20131116-064344.jpg
——————————————————————
It advises:
——————————————————————
“That same year, Dr. Burzynski founded his clinic in Houston where he’s since treated over 8,000 patients.” [3]
——————————————————————

20131116-064326.jpg
——————————————————————
Nowhere does it indicate that he “treated 8,000 patients” with antineoplastons
——————————————————————

20131116-064409.jpg
——————————————————————
The question that Liz Szabo and USA TODAY should answer, is:

1. Who is your “fact-checker”, and
2. are they smarter than a 5th grader ?
——————————————————————
In fact, Burzynski’s 2002 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filing advises:

” … in 1997, his medical practice was expanded to include traditional cancer treatment options such as chemotherapy, gene targeted therapy, immunotherapy and hormonal therapy in response to FDA requirements that cancer patients utilize more traditional cancer treatment options in order to be eligible to participate in the Company’s Antineoplaston clinical trials” [4]
——————————————————————
The article continues:
——————————————————————
“Individual success stories can be misleading, said Arthur Caplan, a professor and head of the division of bioethics at NYU Langone Medical Center”
——————————————————————
The question Arthur Caplan should be asking is:

Why has the United States Food and Drug Administration required Burzynski’s clinical trial patients to fail conventional therapies; such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation, BEFORE they are allowed to be treated with antineoplaston therapy ?

If the F.D.A. did NOT impose these restrictions upon Burzynski’s clinical trials, then the question Arthur Caplan raises would be moot
——————————————————————
The article quotes Dr. Jan Buckner as saying:
——————————————————————
“When I hear a story that is way out of the norm, the first question I ask is,

‘OK, is the diagnosis even correct?‘ ”

Buckner said”

“If the diagnosis wasn’t right to start with, it doesn’t matter what the treatment was.”

“Brain tumors are notoriously difficult to diagnose, Buckner says”

“When dealing with rare brain cancer, doctors may disagree about how to interpret imaging results up to 40% of the time”
——————————————————————
I wonder if Dr. Jan Buckner would agree with David Gorski; who is a BREAST cancer oncology specialist, and NOT a BRAIN cancer oncology specialist, who has the presumptiveness to speculate that 3 different medical opinions could have misdiagnosed Tori Moreno in August 1998; who was diagnosed with a very large tumor, about 3 inches in the largest diameter and located in the brain stem, which was too risky for surgery, and about which her parents were told by ALL 3, that Tori’s brain cancer was fatal and, she would die in a few days or at the most, 2-6 weeks, and that there was nothing that could be done, and was finally put on Burzynski’s antineoplaston therapy in October, when she was about 3 ½ months old, and in such condition that they were afraid that she might die at any time, David H. Gorski, M.D., Ph.D., FACS; who claims, “I do know cancer science” , has the audacity, because of his “book learnin'” has the temerity to postulate his “science-based medicine theory” that Miller’s Children at Long Beach Memorial misdiagnosed Tori Moreno’s inoperable stage 4 BSG

David Gorski has the gall to profer that City of Hope misdiagnosed Tori Moreno’s inoperable stage 4 brain stem glioma

David Gorski has the chutzpah to pontificate that Dr. Fred Epstein in New York misdiagnosed Tori Moreno’s inoperable stage IV brainstem glioma [5]
——————————————————————
The article then quotes Peter Adamson, chair of the Children’s Oncology Group:
——————————————————————
“But these therapies may have delayed benefits, taking weeks or months to shrink a tumor

“So patients treated by Burzynski may credit him for their progress, just because he was the last doctor to treat them, says Peter Adamson, chair of the Children’s Oncology Group, an NCI-supported research network that conducts clinical trials in pediatric cancer

Conventional cancer treatment can also cause tumors to swell temporarily, due to inflammation

“A patient who isn’t familiar with this phenomenon may assume her tumor is growing

“When that swelling subsides, patients may assume it’s because of Burzynski, Adamson says”
——————————————————————
This is laughable

In support of this “phenomenon” , the article provides a link to a Canadian web-site [6]

The site posits:
——————————————————————
“RT/TMZ is now widely practiced and the standard of care for appropriately selected patients, we are learning more about the consequences of RT/TMZ”

“One phenomena, termed Pseudo-Progression (psPD)…”
——————————————————————
The problem is that this only applies to “Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)”, and the article provides NO proof whatsoever, that any of Burzynski’s “Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)” patients have taken “RT/TMZ”
——————————————————————
Additionally, the site cites the reference as:

Sanghera, Perry, Sahgal, et al., “Sunnybrook Health Sciences Odette Cancer Centre” (in press, Canadian Journal of Neuroscience)

(“In press” refers to journal articles which have been accepted for publication, but have not yet been published)

However, the journal article in question was published 1/2010, so it has NOT been “in press” for over 3 years and 7 months [7]

Get your act together, aye, Canada !
——————————————————————
The article rants and raves on and on about FDA inspection reports from as far back as 1998, but at least they did quote Richard A. Jaffe:

“In Burzynski’s defense, Jaffe notes that inspection reports represent preliminary findings

“The FDA has not yet issued final conclusions”
——————————————————————
The article posts this ridiculous claim:
——————————————————————
“Yet the National Cancer Institute says there is no evidence that Burzynski has cured a single patient, or even helped one live longer
——————————————————————
That’s NOT what this seems to suggest [8]
——————————————————————
Then the article quotes pediatric oncologist Peter Adamson, a professor of pediatrics and pharmacology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, in what will no doubt soon be known as a “classic”:
——————————————————————
“He’s a snake oil salesman,” says pediatric oncologist Peter Adamson, a professor of pediatrics and pharmacology at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia”
——————————————————————
All I’d like to know is, which rock did this clown crawl out from under ?

Dr. Adamson, please advise which “snake oil” has been granted Orphan Drug Designation (“ODD”) from the United States Food and Drug Administration [9], and which “snake oil” has been approved for, and used in, phase III clinical trials ? [10]
——————————————————————
Q: Is it, it the phase 2 trial is finished ?

A: “Mhmm”

Q: but they’re still accepting people ?

A: “Yeah”

Q: on more like a special ?

A: Special basis, and, um, sometimes compassionate grounds

A: “(compassion exception)”

A: “Uh, exceptions

Q: That’s normal ?

A: “Yes”
“So”

A: “(Yes I guess it is a funding issue ?)”

Q: Right

A: “(Like FDA, during the 2nd phase of clinical trials they found the data to be, real, real one, and they gave him the ok to go for 3rd phase of clinical trials, but just to go through this process you would probably need $100,000)”
——————————————————————

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20131021-200553.jpg
——————————————————————
Oh, wait !!

Dr. Adamson, when you say “snake oil”, I take it you are referring to the low-dose chemotherapy that Burzynski uses ?

Dr. Adamson, do you know what a “hack” is ?
——————————————————————
In regards to the Merritt’s, the article has:
——————————————————————
“The couple say that Burzynski misled them about the type of treatment that would be offered, as well as the cost”

My questions about the Merritt’s are:

1. Where is their complaint to the Texas Medical Board ?

2. Where is their lawsuit ? Couldn’t they find an attorney to take their case pro bono ?
——————————————————————
The article continues:
——————————————————————
“Yet even Jaffe has acknowledged that the trialnow in its 17th year — was more about politics than science”

“In his 2008 memoirs, Galileo’s Lawyer, Jaffe called it “a joke.”

“”It was all an artifice, a vehicle we and the FDA created to legally give the patients Burzynski’s treatment,” Jaffe said
——————————————————————
What Liz Szabo and her friends at USA TODAY fail to let the readers know, is that this only applied to one trial:
——————————————————————
Burzynski’s lawyer is obviously referring to the CAN-1 clinical trial mentioned in Burzynski’s 11/25/1997 Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filing [11]
——————————————————————
One trial that is retrospective is CAN-1 Clinical Trial
——————————————————————
CAN-1 PHASE II STUDY OF ANTINEOPLASTONS A10 AND AS2-1 IN

PATIENTS WITH REFRACTORY MALIGNANCIES

133 patients
——————————————————————
Clinical trial of patients treated by Dr. Burzynski through 2/23/1996
——————————————————————
FDA has indicated it will not accept data generated by this trial since it was not a wholly prospective one
——————————————————————
The article continues in the same vein:
——————————————————————
“In an interview, Burzynski said developing new drugs is complex and takes time

“Yet the FDA has approved 108 cancer drugs since Burzynski began his trial”
——————————————————————
Ms. Szabo and “pals” conveniently “forgets” to educate their audience that Burzynski was using Fleming’s One-sample multiple testing procedure for phase II clinical trials [13], which requires that if the 1st 20 patients meet certain criteria, 20 additional patients are added [14]
——————————————————————
“Well, we cannot publish until the time is right” (laughs)

Yeah

“If you would like to publish the results of, of a
10 year survival, for instance”

Mmm

“Which we have
Nobody has over 10 year survival in
malignant brain tumor, but we do, and if you like to do it right, it takes time to prepare it, and that’s what we do now
What we publish so far
We publish numerous, uh, publications which were, interim reports when we are still continuing clinical trials
Now we are preparing, a number of publications for final reports
[15]
——————————————————————
Then Fran Visco, president of the National Breast Cancer Coalition makes an outlandish statement, which is quoted in the article:
——————————————————————
“Fran Visco, president of the National Breast Cancer Coalition, describes the FDA’s tolerance of Burzynski as “outrageous.”

“They have put people at risk for a long time,” says Visco, an attorney and breast cancer survivor

“That’s completely unacceptable”

“How can anyone look at these facts and believe that there is a real clinical trial going on … rather than just using the FDA and the clinical trial system to make money?”
——————————————————————
I have a suggestion for Ms. Visco

Take your hypocrisy and ask the American Cancer Society if they are still engaged in this kind of activity:

1. AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY: More Interested In Accumulating Wealth Than Saving Lives [15]

2. National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society: Criminal Indifference to Cancer Prevention and Conflicts of Interest [16]
——————————————————————
Then, ask the American Cancer Society, why is it that 10 years ago, estimated breast cancer deaths were expected to be 39,800 (15%), and this year it was 39,620 (14%), which is ONLY 180 LESS than 10 years ago ?
——————————————————————
Estimated Breast Cancer Deaths (Women)-USA
——————————————————————
2013☝39,620 (14%)
2012👇39,510 (14%)
2011👇39,520 (15%)
2010👇39,840 (15%)
2009👇40,170 (15%)
2008☝40,480 (15%)
2007👇40,460 (15%)
2006☝40,970 (15%)
2005👇40,410 (15%)
2004☝40,110 (15%)
2003☝39,800 (15%)
2002
39,600 (15%)
—————————————————————–
American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures (2002-2013)
—————————————————————–
And then ask the American Cancer Society, why is it that 10 years ago, the estimated NEW breast cancer cases were expected to be 211,300 (32%), and this year it was 232,340 (29%), which is 21,340 MORE than it was 10 years ago ?
——————————————————————
Estimated New Breast Cancer (Women) – USA
——————————————————————
2013☝232,340 (29%)
2012👇226,870 (29%)
2011☝238,480 (30%)
2010☝207,090 (28%)
2009☝192,370 (27%)
2008☝182,460 (26%)

2007👇178,480 (26%)
2006☝212,920 (31%)
2005👇211,240 (32%)
2004☝215,900 (32%)
2003☝211,300 (32%)
2002
_-_203,500 (31%)
—————————————————————–
American Cancer Society Cancer Facts & Figures (2002-2013)
——————————————————————
And after that, ask Susan G. Komen how much is spent on legal action to protect her brand, compared to how much is spent on breast cancer research and prevention ?
——————————————————————
Visco, the breast cancer advocate

“I do NOT know why it took YOU so long.”
——————————————————————
The article continues with:
——————————————————————
“Yet hypernatremia is one of antineoplastons’ most common side effects, known to doctors for two decades”
——————————————————————
Yet, “The Skeptics™” refuse to discuss:
——————————————————————
2/13/2013 – The frequency, cost, and clinical outcomes of hypernatremia in patients hospitalized to a comprehensive cancer center

Over 3 month period in 2006 re 3,446 patients, most of the hypernatremia (90 %) was acquired during hospital stay [19]

Division of Internal Medicine, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA

Department of General Internal Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Division of Endocrinology, Mayo Clinic
——————————————————————
9/1999 – The changing pattern of hypernatremia in hospitalized children [20]

Department of Pediatrics, Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, USA
——————————————————————
So, after all that, my question for USA TODAY is, does Liz Szabo, Michael Stravato, Jerry Mosemak or Robert Hanashiro have a
journalism degree ?

Because if any of them do, the institution they obtained it from most be so proud of this piece of “fish wrap” you produced

Thank you, USA TODAY, for censoring my 18 comments

I guess you must be (“intellectual”) cowards

At least Forbes had the GRAPEFRUITS to post some of my comments
——————————————————————
You’ve just been served, INSOLENTLY
——————————————————————
USA TODAY, GONE TOMORROW
——————————————————————

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======================================
REFERENCES:
======================================
[1] – 11/15/2013 – USA TODAY NEWS, NATION
Doctor accused of selling false hope to families
Liz Szabo, USA TODAY
——————————————————————
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/11/15/stanislaw-burzynski-cancer-controversy/2994561/
======================================
[2] – Mayo Clinic – 1999 – report: Lisa Merritt
——————————————————————
https://www.documentcloud.org/documents/816819-mayo-clinic-1999-report.html
======================================
[3] – 2012 – former Burzynski web-site screenshots, Pg 3 of 62;
——————————————————————
http://www.circare.org/info/bri/burzynski_fdauntitled_promo_2012.pdf
======================================
[4] – 4/26/2013 – Burzynski: FDA requirements that cancer patients utilize more traditional cancer treatment options in order to be eligible to participate in the Company’s Antineoplaston CLINICAL TRIALS:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/burzynski-fda-requirements-that-cancer-patients-utilize-more-traditional-cancer-treatment-options-in-order-to-be-eligible-to-participate-in-the-companys-antineoplaston-clinical-trials/
======================================
[5] – 11/14/2013 – Critiquing: Why we fight for patients (Why we fight your patience) TAM 2013, TAM2013, “The Amazing Meeting” 2013 #TAM2013 http://www.theamazingmeeting.com
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/tam-2013-tam2013-tam2013-the-amazing-meeting-2013-the-amazing-meeting-httptheamazingmeeting-com-httpwww-theamazingmeeting-com/
======================================
[6] – Phenomenon – Brain Tumour Foundation of Canada
——————————————————————
http://www.braintumour.ca/1649/ask-the-expert-psuedo-progression-gbm
======================================
[7] – Pseudoprogression following chemoradiotherapy for glioblastoma multiforme
Can J Neurol Sci. 2010 Jan;37(1):36-42
——————————————————————
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20169771/
======================================
[8] – 9/19/2013 – Critiquing: National Cancer Institute (NCI) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) CancerNet “fact sheet” :
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/09/19/critiquing-national-cancer-institute-nci-at-the-national-institutes-of-health-nih-cancernet/
======================================
[9] – FDA Orphan Drug Designation
——————————————————————
http://www.burzynskiresearch.com/assets/PressRelease_12022008_BZYR(2).pdf
======================================
[10] – 11/7/2013Pete Cohen chats with Sonali Patil, Ph.D., Research Scientist at The Burzynski Clinic:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/07/pete-cohen-chats-with-sonali-patil-ph-d-research-scientist-at-the-burzynski-clinic/
======================================
[11] – 7/9/2013 – Burzynski: The Original 72 Phase II Clinical Trials:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/07/09/burzynski-the-original-72-phase-ii-clinical-trials/
======================================
[12] – 8/21/2013 – Critiquing David H. Gorski, MD, PhD, FACS http://www.sciencebasedmedicine.org/editorial-staff/david-h-gorski-md-phd-managing-editor/
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/08/21/critiquing-david-h-gorski-md-phd-facs-www-sciencebasedmedicine-orgeditorial-staffdavid-h-gorski-md-phd-managing-editor/
======================================
[13] – 2003 – pg. 94
——————————————————————
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/960.pdf
======================================
[14] – 3/1982 – Biometrics 1982; 38: 143-51
——————————————————————
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7082756/
======================================
[15] – 11/9/2013Pete Cohen chats with Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski – Interview #2:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/09/pete-cohen-chats-with-dr-stanislaw-burzynski-interwiew-2/
======================================
[16] – AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY: More Interested In Accumulating Wealth Than Saving Lives
——————————————————————
http://www.wnho.net/acs.pdf
======================================
[17] – 9/11/2013 – National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society: Criminal Indifference to Cancer Prevention and Conflicts of Interest:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/09/11/national-cancer-institute-and-american-cancer-society-criminal-indifference-to-cancer-prevention-and-conflicts-of-interest/
—————————————————————
[18] – 11/13/2013 – The War on Cancer (I don’t think it means, what you think it says it means) #Winning?
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/11/13/httpcancer-orgacsgroupscontentepidemiologysurveilancedocumentsdocumentacspc-036845-pdf/
======================================
[19] – 4/24/2013 – Burzynski: HYPERNATREMIA:
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/04/24/burzynski-hypernatremia/
======================================
[20] – 9/1999 – Pediatrics. 1999 Sep;104(3 Pt 1):435-9
——————————————————————
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10469766/
======================================

20131116-002912.jpg

The War on Cancer (I don’t think it means, what you think it says it means) #Winning?

“In 1971, the ACS (American Cancer Society) aggressively campaigned President Nixon to declare the “War on Cancer,” claiming that this could be won, given increased funding for the National Cancer Institute (NCI)

“President Nixon responded by increasing its funding by $200,000”

“This was in excess of the funding that it then received as one of 30 other National Institutes of Health”

“In so doing, President Nixon effectively created an independent status for the NCI [0]
——————————————————————
American Cancer Society
——————————————————————
Cancer Facts & Figures 2002-2013
——————————————————————
Expected New Cancer Cases – USA
——————————————————————
2013☝1,660,290 – (21,380 more than 2012)
2012☝1,638,910 – (42,240 more than 2011)
2011☝1,596,670 – (67,160 more than 2010)
2010☝1,529,560 – (49,810 more than 2009)
2009☝1,479,350 – (42,170 more than 2008)

2008👇1,437,180 – ( 7,740 less than 2007)
2007☝1,444,920 – (45,130 more than 2006)
2006☝1,399,790 – (26,880 more than 2005)
2005☝1,372,910 – ( 4,870 more than 2004)
2004☝1,368,030 – (33,930 more than 2003)
2003☝1,334,100 – (49,200 more than 2002)
2002
1,284,900
——————————————————————
Expected to Die – United States
——————————————————————
2013☝580,350_-_(3,160 more than 2012)
2012☝577,190
_-_(5,240 more than 2011)
2011☝571,950
_-_(2,460 more than 2010)
2010☝569,490
_-_(7,150 more than 2009)
2009👇562,340_-_(3,310 less than 2008)
2008☝565,650_-_(6,000 more than 2007)
2007👇559,650_-_(5,180 less than 2006)
2006👇564,830_-_(5,450 less than 2005)
2005☝570,280_-_(6,580 more than 2004
2004☝563,700
_-_(7,200 more than 2003)
2003☝556,500
_-_(6,000 more than 2002)
2002
_-_555,500
——————————————————————
Deaths – United States of America
——————————————————————
2013almost 1,600 a day
2012 – 1,500+ a day
2011 – 1,500+ a day
2010 – 1,500+ a day
2009 – 1,500+ a day
2008 – 1,500+ a day
2007 – 1,500+ a day
2006 – 1,500+ a day
2005 – 1,500+ a day
2004 – 1,500+ a day
2003 – 1,500+ a day
======================================
Estimated Childhood Cancer Deaths (0-14 years)
——————————————————————
2013👇1, 310
2012☝1,340
2011👇1,320
2010👇1,340
2009👇1,380
2008👇1,490
2007👇1,545
2006👇1,560
2005☝1,585
2004☝1,510
2003☝1,500
2002
1,400
——————————————————————
Estimated New Childhood Cancer (0-14 years)
——————————————————————
2013👇11,630
2012☝12,060
2011☝11,210

2010👇10,700
200910,730
2008☝10,730
2007☝10,400

2006👇9,500
2005☝9,510
2004☝9,200

2003👇9,000
20029,100
======================================
Estimated Brain and other nervous system Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝6,150 (2%)
2012☝5,980 (2%)

2011👇5,670 (2%)
2010☝5,720 (2%)
2009👇5,590 (2%)
2008☝5,650 (2%)
2007☝5,590 (2%)
2006☝5,560 (2%)

2005👇5,480 (2%)
2004👇5,490 (2%)
2003👇5,800 (2%)
20025,900 (2%)
======================================
Estimated All Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇273,430 (100%)
2012☝275,370 (100%)
2011☝271,520 (100%)
2010☝270,290 (100%)

2009👇269800 (100%)
2008☝271,530 (100%)
2007👇270,100 (100%)
2006👇273,560 (100%)
2005☝275,000 (100%)
2004☝272,810 (100%)
2003☝270,600 (100%)
2002
_-_267,300 (100%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Lung and bronchus Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇72,220 (26%)
2012☝72,590 (26%)
2011☝71,340 (26%)
2010☝71,080 (26%)

2009👇70,490 (26%)
2008☝71,030 (26%)
2007👇70,880 (26%)
2006👇72,130 (26%)
2005☝73,020 (27%)
2004👇68,510 (25%)
2003☝68,800 (25%)
2002
65,700 (25%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Breast Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝39,620 (14%)
2012👇39,510 (14%)
2011👇39,520 (15%)
2010👇39,840 (15%)
2009👇40,170 (15%)
2008☝40,480 (15%)
2007👇40,460 (15%)
2006☝40,970 (15%)
2005👇40,410 (15%)
2004☝40,110 (15%)
2003☝39,800 (15%)
2002
39,600 (15%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Colon and rectum Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇24,530 (9%)
2012☝25,220 (9%)
2011👇24,130 (9%)
2010👇24,790 (9%)
2009👇24,680 (9%)
2008👇25,790 (9%)
2007👇26,180 (10%)
2006👇27,300 (10%)
2005👇27,750 (10%)
2004👇28,410 (10%)
200328,800 (11%)
2002
28,800 (11%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Pancreas Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝18,970 (7%)
2012☝18,540 (7%)
2011☝18,300 (7%)
2010☝18,030 (7%)
2009☝17,210 (6%)
2008☝16,790 (6%)
2007☝16,530 (6%)
2006☝16,210 (6%)
2005☝15,980 (6%)
2004☝15,830 (6%)
2003☝15,300 (16%)
2002
15,200 (16%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Ovary Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇14,030 (5%)
2012☝15,500 (6%)
2011☝15,460 (6%)

2010👇13,850 (5%)
2009👇14,600 (5%)
2008☝15,520 (6%)
2007👇15,280 (6%)
2006👇15,310 (6%)
2005☝16,210 (6%)
2004☝16,090 (6%)
2003☝14,300 (5%)
2002
13,900 (5%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Leukemia Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝10,060 (4%)
2012☝10,040 (4%)

2011👇9,040 (3%)
2010👇9,180 (3%)
2009☝9,280 (3%)
2008👇9,250 (3%)
2007👇9,470 (4%)
2006👇9,810 (4%)
2005👇10,030 (4%)
2004☝10,310 (4%)
2003☝9,800 (4%)
2002
9,600 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇8,430 (3%)
2012👇8,620 (3%)
2011☝9,570 (4%)
2010👇9,500 (4%)
2009☝9,670 (4%)
2008☝9,370 (3%)
2007☝9,060 (3%)

2006👇8,840 (3%)
2005☝9,050 (3%)
2004👇9,020 (3%)
2003👇11,200 (4%)
200211,700 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Uterine corpus Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝8,190 (3%)
2012👇8,010 (3%)
2011☝8,120 (3%)
2010☝7,950 (3%)
2009☝7,780 (3%)
2008☝7,470 (3%)
2007☝7,400 (3%)
2006☝7,350 (3%)
2005☝7,310 (3%)
2004☝7,090 (3%)
2003☝6,800 (3%)
2002
6,600 (2%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Liver and intrahepatic bile duct Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝6,780 (2%)
2012☝6,570 (2%)
2011☝6,330 (2%)
2010☝6,190 (2%)
2009☝6,070 (2%)
2008☝5,840 (2%)
2007
5,500 (2%)
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
——————————————————————
Estimated Multiple myeloma Cancer Deaths (Women)
——————————————————————
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006👇5,630 (2%)
20055,640 (2%)
2004☝5,640 (2%)
2003☝5,500 (2%)
2002
5,300 (2%)
======================================
Estimated New Cancer All (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝805,500 (100%)
2012☝790,740 (100%)
2011☝774,370 (100%)
2010☝739,940 (100%)
2009☝713,220 (100%)
2008☝692,000 (100%)

2007👇678,060 (100%)
2006☝679,510 (100%)
2005👇662,870 (100%)
2004☝668,470 (100%)
2003☝658,800 (100%)
2002
_-_647,400 (100%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Breast Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝232,340 (29%)
2012👇226,870 (29%)
2011☝238,480 (30%)
2010☝207,090 (28%)
2009☝192,370 (27%)
2008☝182,460 (26%)

2007👇178,480 (26%)
2006☝212,920 (31%)
2005👇211,240 (32%)
2004☝215,900 (32%)
2003☝211,300 (32%)
2002
_-_203,500 (31%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Lung and bronchus Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝110,110 (14%)
2012☝109,690 (14%)
2011☝106,070 (14%)
2010☝105,770 (14%)
2009☝103,350 (14%)
2008☝100,330 (14%)
2007☝98,620 (15%)
2006☝81,770 (12%)

2005👇79,560 (12%)
2004☝80,660 (12%)
2003☝80,100 (12%)
2002
79,200 (12%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Colon and rectum Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇69,140 (9%)
2012☝70,040 (9%)
2011👇69,360 (9%)
2010👇70,480 (10%)
2009👇71,380 (10%)
2008👇71,560 (10%)
2007👇74,630 (11%)
2006☝75,810 (11%)
2005☝73,470 (11%)

2004👇73,320 (11%)
2003👇74,700 (11%)
200275,700 (12%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Uterine corpus Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝49,560 (6%)
2012☝47,130 (6%)
2011☝46,470 (6%)
2010☝43,470 (6%)
2009☝42,160 (6%)
2008☝41,100 (6%)

2007👇39,080 (6%)
2006☝41,200 (6%)
2005☝40,880 (6%)

2004👇40,320 (6%)
2003☝41,00 (6%)
2002
39,300 (6%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Thyroid Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝45,310 (6%)
2012☝43,210 (5%)
2011☝36,550 (5%)
2010☝33,930 (5%)

2009👇27,200 (4%)
2008☝28,410 (4%)
2007☝25,480 (4%)
2006☝22,590 (3%)
2005☝19,190 (3%)
2004☝17,640 (3%)
2003☝16,300 (3%)
2002
15,800 (2%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝32,140 (4%)
2012☝31,970 (4%)
2011☝30,300 (4%)
2010☝30,160 (4%)

2009👇29,990 (4%)
2008☝30,660 (4%)
2007☝28,990 (4%)
2006☝28,190 (4%)
2005☝27,320 (4%)
2004☝25,520 (4%)

2003👇25,100 (4%)
200225,700 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Melanoma of the skin Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇31,630 (4%)
2012☝32,000 (4%)
2011☝30,220 (4%)

2010👇29,260 (4%)
2009☝29,640 (4%)
2008☝27,530 (4%)

2007👇26,030 (4%)
2006☝27,930 (4%)
2005☝26,000 (4%)
2004☝25,200 (4%)
2003☝24,300 (3%)
2002
23,500 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Kidney and renal pelvis Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝24,720 (3%)
2012☝24,520 (4%)
2011☝23,800 (3%)
2010☝22,870 (3%)
2009☝22,330 (3%)
2008☝21,260 (3%)
2007
19,600 (3%)
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
——————————————————————
Estimated New Pancreas Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013☝22,489 (3%)
2012👇21,830 (3%)
2011☝21,980 (3%)
2010☝21,770 (3%)
2009 21,420 (3%)

2008
2007
2006☝16,580 (2%)
2005👇16,080 (2%)
2004☝16,120 (2%)
2003☝15,800 (2%)
2002
15,600 (2%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Ovary Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013👇22,240 (3%)
2012☝22,280 (3%)
2011☝21,990 (3%)
2010☝21,880 (3%)

2009👇21,550 (3%)
2008👇21,650 (3%)
2007☝22,430 (3%)
2006👇20,180 (3%)
2005👇22,220 (3%)
2004☝25,580 (4%)
2003☝25,400 (4%)
2002
23,300 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Leukemia (Women)
——————————————————————
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008👇19,090 (3%)
200719,440 (3%)
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
——————————————————————
Estimated New Urinary bladder Cancer (Women)
——————————————————————
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006☝16,730 (2%)
2005☝16,200 (2%)
2004☝15,600 (2%)
2003
15,200 (2%)
2002
15,200 (2%)
======================================
Estimated All Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝306,920 (100%)
2012☝301,820 (100%)
2011☝300,430 (100%)
2010☝299,200 (100%)

2009👇292,540 (100%)
2008☝294,120 (100%)
2007👇289,550 (100%)
2006👇291,270 (100%)
2005☝295,280 (100%)
2004☝290,890 (100%)

2003👇285,900 (100%)
2002_-_288,200 (100%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Lung and bronchus Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013👇87,260 (28%)
2012☝87,750 (29%)
2011👇85,600 (28%)
2010👇86,220 (29%)
2009👇88,900 (30%)
2008☝98,810 (31%)
2007👇89,510 (31%)
2006👇90,330 (31%)
2005👇90,490 (31%)
2004☝91,930 (32%)
2003👇88,400 (31%)
200289,200 (31%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Prostate Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝29,720 (10%)
2012👇28,170 (9%)
2011☝33,720 (11%)
2010☝32,050 (11%)

2009👇27,360 (9%)
2008☝28,660 (10%)
2007👇27,050 (9%)
2006👇27,350 (9%)
2005☝30,350 (10%)
2004☝29,500 (10%)

2003👇28,900 (10%)
200230,200 (11%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Colon and rectum Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013👇26,300 (9%)
2012☝26,470 (9%)
2011👇25,250 (8%)
2010☝26,580 (9%)
2009☝25,240 (9%)

2008👇24,260 (8%)
2007👇26,000 (9%)
2006👇27,870 (10%)
2005☝28,540 (10%)
2004☝28,320 (10%)
2003☝28,300 (10%)
2002
27,800 (10%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Pancreas Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝19,480 (6%)
2012👇18,850 (6%)
2011☝19,360 (3%)
2010☝18,770 (6%)
2009☝18,030 (6%)
2008☝17,500 (6%)
2007☝16,840 (6%)
2006☝16,090 (6%)
2005☝15,820 (5%)
2004☝15,440 (5%)
2003☝14,700 (5%)
2002
14,500 (5%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Liver and intrahepatic bile duct Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝14,890 (5%)
2012☝13,980 (5%)
2011☝13,260 (4%)
2010☝12,720 (4%)

2009👇12,090 (4%)
2008☝12,570 (4%)
2007☝11,280 (4%)
2006☝10,840 (4%)
2005☝10,330 (3%)
2004☝9,450 (3%)
2003☝9,200 (3%)
2002
8,900 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Leukemia Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝13,660 (4%)
2012☝13,500 (4%)
2011☝12,740 (4%)
2010☝12,660 (4%)
2009☝12,590 (4%)
2008☝12,460 (4%)

2007👇12,320 (4%)
2006👇12,470 (4%)
2005👇12,540 (4%)
2004☝12,990 (5%)
2003
12,100 (4%)
2002
12,100 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Esophagus Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝12,220 (4%)
2012☝12,040 (4%)
2011☝11,910 (4%)
2010☝11,650 (4%)
2009☝11,490 (4%)
2008☝11,250 (4%)
2007☝10,900 (4%)
2006☝10,730 (4%)
2005☝10,530 (4%)
2004☝10,250 (4%)
2003☝9,900 (4%)
2002
9,600 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Urinary bladder Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝10,820 (4%)
2012👇10,510 (3%)
2011☝10,670 (4%)
2010☝10,410 (3%)
2009☝10,180 (3%)
2008☝9,950 (3%)
2007☝9,630 (3%)
2006☝8,990 (3%)
2005☝8,970 (3%)
2004☝8,780 (3%)
2003
8,600 (3%)
2002
8,600 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Non-Hodgkin lymphoma Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝10,590 (3%)
2012☝10,320 (3%)

2011👇9,750 (3%)
2010☝10,710 (4%)
2009☝9,830 (3%)
2008☝9,790 (3%)

2007👇9,600 (3%)
2006👇10,000 (3%)
2005👇10,150 (3%)
2004👇10,390 (4%)
2003👇12,200 (4%)
200212,700 (5%)
——————————————————————
Estimated Kidney and renal pelvis Cancer Deaths (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝8,780 (3%)
2012☝8,650 (3%)
2011☝8,270 (3%)
2010☝8,210 (3%)
2009☝8,160 (3%)
2008☝8,100 (3%)

2007👇8,080 (3%)
2006☝8,130 (3%)
2005☝8,020 (3%)
2004☝7,870 (3%)
2003☝7,409 (3%)
2002
7,200 (3%)
======================================
Estimated New Cancer All (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝854,790 (100%)
2012☝848,170 (100%)
2011☝822,300 (100%)
2010☝789,620 (100%)
2009☝766,130 (100%)

2008👇745,180 (100%)
2007☝766,860 (100%)
2006☝720,280 (100%)
2005☝710,040 (100%)
2004☝699,560 (100%)
2003☝675,300 (100%)
2002
_-_637,500 (100%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Prostate Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013👇238,590 (28%)
2012☝241,470 (29%)
2011☝240,890 (29%)
2010☝217,730 (28%)
2009☝192,280 (25%)

2008👇186,320 (25%)
2007👇218,890 (29%)
2006☝234,460 (33%)
2005☝232,090 (33%)
2004☝230,110 (33%)
2003☝220,900 (33%)
2002
_-_189,000 (30%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Lung and bronchus Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝118,080 (14%)
2012☝116,470 (14%)

2011👇115,060 (14%)
2010☝116,750 (15%)
2009☝116,090 (15%)

2008👇114,690 (15%)
2007☝114,760 (15%)
2006👇92,700 (13%)
2005👇93,010 (13%)
2004☝93,110 (13%)
2003☝91,800 (14%)
2002
90,200 (14%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Colon and rectum Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝73,680 (13%)
2012☝73,420 (9%)

2011👇71,850 (9%)
2010👇72,090 (9%)
2009👇75,590 (10%)
2008👇77,250 (10%)
2007☝79,130 (10%)
2006☝72,800 (10%)

2005👇71,820 (10%)
2004☝73,620 (11%)
2003☝72,800 (11%)
2002
72,600 (11%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Urinary bladder Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013👇54,610 (6%)
2012☝55,600 (7%)
2011👇52,020 (6%)
2010👇52,760 (7%)
2009☝52,810 (7%)
2008☝51,230 (7%)
2007☝50,040 (7%)

2006👇44,690 (6%)
2005☝47,010 (7%)
2004☝44,640 (6%)
2003☝42,200 (6%)
2002
41,500 (7%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Melanoma of the skin Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝45,060 (5%)
2012☝44,250 (5%)
2011☝40,010 (5%)

2010👇38,870 (5%)
2009☝39,080 (5%)
2008☝34,950 (5%)

2007👇33,910 (4%)
2006☝34,260 (5%)
2005☝33,580 (5%)
2004 – 29,900 (4%)

2003👇29,900 (4%)
200230,100 (5%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Kidney and renal pelvis Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝40,430 (5%)
2012☝40,250 (5%)
2011☝37,120 (5%)

2010👇35,370 (4%)
2009☝35,430 (5%)
2008☝33,130 (4%)
2007☝31,590 (4%)
2006☝24,650 (3%)
2005☝22,490 (3%)
2004☝22,080 (3%)
2003☝19,500 (3%)
2002
19,100 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (Men)
——————————————————————
2013👇37,600 (4%)
2012☝38,160 (4%)
2011☝36,060 (4%)

2010👇35,380 (4%)
2009☝35,990 (5%)
2008☝35,450 (5%)
2007☝34,200 (4%)
2006☝30,680 (4%)
2005☝29,070 (4%)
2004☝28,850 (4%)
2003☝28,300 (4%)
2002
28,200 (4%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Oral cavity and pharynx Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝29,620 (3%)
2012☝28,540 (3%)
2011☝27,710 (3%)
2010☝25,420 (3%)

2009👇25,240 (3%)
2008☝25,310 (3%)
2007☝24,180 (3%)
2006☝20,180 (3%)
2005☝19,100 (3%)
2004☝18,550 (3%)

2003👇18,200 (3%)
200218,900 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Leukemia (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝27,880 (3%)
2012☝26,830 (3%)
2011☝25,320 (3%)

2010👇24,690 (3%)
2009☝25,630 (3%)
2008☝25,180 (3%)
2007☝24,800 (3%)
2006☝20,000 (3%)
2005☝19,640 (3%)
2004☝19,020 (3%)
2003☝17,900 (3%)
2002
17,600 (3%)
——————————————————————
Estimated New Pancreas Cancer (Men)
——————————————————————
2013☝22,740 (3%)
2012☝22,090 (3%)
2011☝22,050 (3%)
2010☝21,370 (3%)
2009☝21,050 (3%)

2008👇18,770 (3%)
2007☝18,830 (2%)
2006☝17,150 (2%)
2005☝16,109 (2%)
2004☝15,740 (2%)
2003☝14,900 (2%)
2002
14,700 (2%)
======================================

20131113-231037.jpg

20131113-113632.jpg
——————————————————————
American Cancer Society
——————————————————————
Cancer Facts & Figures
======================================
REFERENCES:
======================================
[0] – AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

More Interested In Accumulating Wealth Than Saving Lives

Samuel S. Epstein, M.D.

Emeritus professor Environmental and Occupational Medicine

University of Illinois School of Public Health

and

Chairman, The Cancer Prevention Coalition
——————————————————————
http://www.wnho.net/acs.pdf
======================================
2013
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-036845.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-036845.pdf
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http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2013/index
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2013/index
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http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2013
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2013
======================================
2012
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http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-031941.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-031941.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2012/index
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2012/index
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http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2012
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2012
======================================
2011
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http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-029771.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@epidemiologysurveilance/documents/document/acspc-029771.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2011
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2011
======================================
2010
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/acspc-024113.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/acspc-024113.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2010/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2010/index
======================================
2009
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/500809webpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/500809webpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2009/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2009/index
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2009
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http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2009
======================================
2008
——————————————————————
http://www.oralcancerfoundation.org/facts/pdf/worldcancer.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2008/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2008/index
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http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/allcancerfactsfigures/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/allcancerfactsfigures/index
======================================
2007
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2007pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2007pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2007/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/cancerfactsfigures2007/index
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2007
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2007
======================================
2006
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2006pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2006pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2006
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2006
======================================
2005
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2005f4pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/acs/groups/content/@nho/documents/document/caff2005f4pwsecuredpdf.pdf
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/allcancerfactsfigures/index
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsstatistics/allcancerfactsfigures/index
——————————————————————
http://cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2005
——————————————————————
http://m.cancer.org/research/cancerfactsfigures/cancerfactsfigures/cancer-facts-figures-2005
======================================
2004
——————————————————————
http://www.pink-ribbon-pins.com/CancerRates2004.pdf
======================================
2003
——————————————————————
http://www.whyquit.com/studies/2003_ACS_Cancer_Facts.pdf
======================================
2002
——————————————————————
http://www.uhmsi.com/docs/CancerFacts&Figures2002.pdf
======================================

Burzynski: Oh, RATS!!!

After again showing how questionable the “research” of #ScienceBasedMedicine Dr. David H. “Orac” Gorski is:
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/07/23/is-dr-david-h-orac-gorski-down-and-out-in-detroit-and-an-ethically-bankrupt-researcher-2/
and he is involved in the “War on Cancer,”(!!!) I decided to provide this more in-depth listing of Burzynski related scientific publications regarding animal, mice, and rat studies re: antineoplastons
——————————————————————
1983 – Burzynski SR, Hendry LB, Mohabbat MO, et al. Purification of structure determination, synthesis and animal toxicity studies of antineoplaston A10. In: Proceedings of the 13th International Congress of Chemotherapy. Vienna, Austria; 1983:17, PS. 12.4 11-4.
——————————————————————
1984 – Burzynski, S.R., Mohabbat MO, Burzynski B.
Animal toxicology studies on oral formulation of antineoplaston A10
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1984;10:113-118
——————————————————————
1984 – Lee, S.S., Mohabbat, M.O., Burzynski, S.R.
Tissue culture and animal toxicity studies of antineoplaston A2
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1984;10:607-610
——————————————————————
1985 – Lee, S.S., Mohabbat, M.O., Burzynski, S.R.
Tissue culture and acute animal toxicity studies of antineoplaston A2
Future Trends in Chemotherapy 1985;6:481-484
——————————————————————
1986 – Burzynski, S., Mohabbat. M., Lee, S.
Preclinical studies of antineoplaston AS2-1 in mice with oral administration
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1986;132
——————————————————————
1986 – Burzynski, S. R., Mohabbat, M. O. , Le e, S. S. Pre clinical studies of antineoplaston AS2-1 and antineoplaston AS2-5
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1986;12 (suppl1):11-16
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3743376/
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1986;12 Suppl 1:11-6.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3743376/
——————————————————————
1986 – Ashraf, AQ., Liau, M.C., Mohabbat, M.O., Burzynski, S.R.
Preclinical studies of antineoplaston A10 injections.
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1986;12 (suppl 1):37-45.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3743379/
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1986;12 Suppl 1:37-45.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3743379/
——————————————————————
1986 – Burzynski, S.R., Mohabbat M.O.
Chronic animal toxicity studies on antineoplaston A2.
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1986;12 (suppl 1):73-75.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3743382/
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1986;12 Suppl 1:73-5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3743382/
——————————————————————
1987 – Lee, S.S., Mohabbat, M.O., Burzynski, SR
In vitro cancer growth inhibition and animal toxicity studies of antineoplaston A3
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1987;13 (suppl1):13-16
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3569011/
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1987;13 Suppl 1:13-6.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3569011/
——————————————————————
1987 – Lee, S.S., Burzynski, S.R
Tissue culture and animal toxicity studies of antineoplaston A5
Drugs Exptl Clin Res 1987;13 (suppl 1):31-5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3569013/
Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1987;13 Suppl 1:31-5.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3569013/
——————————————————————
1987 – Ashraf AQ, Liau MC, Kampalath BN, et al. Pharmacokinetic study of radioactive antineoplaston A10 following oral administration in rats. Drugs Exptl Clin Res. 1987;13(suppl 1):45-50.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3569015/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3569015/
——————————————————————
1988 – Ashraf, AQ., Kampalath, B.N., Burzynski, S.R
Pharmacokinetic analysis of antineoplaston A10 injections following intravenous administration in rats
Adv Exptl Clin Chemother 1988;6:33-39
http://www.encognitive.com/node/2449
——————————————————————
7/20/1988 – Chemopreventive effect of antineoplaston A-10 on urethane-induced pulmonary neoplasm in mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3183462
Nihon Gan Chiryo Gakkai Shi. 1988 Jul.20; 23 (7):1560-5
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/3183462
23(7):1560-5 (1988)
Tsuda
N E
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1/20/1990 – A-10 Injection – The anticancer effect of antineoplaston A-10 on human breast cancer serially transplanted to athymic mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2157780
Nihon Gan Chiryo Gakkai Shi. 1990 Jan 20;25(1):1-5
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/2157780
1st Department of Surgery, Kurume University School of Medicine
The Anticancer Effect of Antineoplaston A-10 on Human Breast Cancer Serially Transplanted to Athymic Mice, Journal of the Japan Society for Cancer Therapy 25(1):1-5 (1990)
Hashimoto K, Koga T, Shintomi Y, Tanaka M, Kakegawa T, Tsuda H, Hara H.
http://www.abstractboard.com/abstract/2157780/The-anticancer-effect-of-antineoplaston-A-10-on-human-breast-cancer-serially-transplanted-to-athymic.html
——————————————————————
1990 – Inhibitory effect of antineoplaston A-10 on breast cancer transplanted to athymic mice and human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines. The members of Antineoplaston Study Group
Tsuda H (Japan) et al
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2175003
Kurume Med J. 1990;37(2):97-104
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/2175003
Kurume Med J 37 (2):97-104 (1990)
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/kurumemedj1954/37/2/37_2_97/_article
Kurume University School of Medicine, Japan
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/kurumemedj1954/37/2/37_2_97/_article/references
Burzynski References: 1 – 8 and 11 – 14
http://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/kurumemedj1954/37/2/37_2_97/_pdf
The Kurume Medical Journal
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/abstract
J-STAGE, Japan Science and Technology Information Aggregator, Electronic
http://ci.nii.ac.jp/naid/130000888719
——————————————————————
1991 – Inhibitory effect of orally administered antineoplaston A10 on the growth curve of human breast cancer transplanted to athymic mice
http://jglobal.jst.go.jp/public/20090422/200902015871267390
J Jpn Soc Cancer Ther 26:595-601, 1991
26:3:595-601:1991 03
Kurume Univ. School of Medicine
NISHIDA H, YOSHIDA H, KUBOTA H
——————————————————————
5/1992 – The inhibitory effect of the combination of antineoplaston A-10 injection with a small dose of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum on cell and tumor growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma
H TSUDA, et al (Japan)
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1377669
The Inhibitory Effect of the Combination of Antineoplaston A-10 Injection with a Small Dose of cis-Diamminedichloroplatinum on Cell and Tumor Growth of Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/1377669
Jpn J Cancer Res. 1992 May;83(5):527-31
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/abstract
Jpn. J. Cancer Res. 83, 527-531
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/asset/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x.pdf?v=1&t=hd97ht7z&s=3481466c7830e5f8e2bb925a698de6f8155da747
Jpn J Cancer Res. 1992 May;83 (5):527-31
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/asset/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x.pdf;jsessionid=4ECD3F595A3971B5AB87763862867844.d03t02?v=1&t=hbmd55gj&s=a14b626a37db3ecd558109cee30dfe26c71827763862867844
Jpn J Cancer Res 83 (5):527-31 (1992)
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/asset/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x.pdf?v=1&t=hkfile3i&s=2756f110cf2202084cfc90a3715d8f1f9df7774c
Department of Anesthesiology, Kurume University, School of Medicine, Fukuoka-ken
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/store/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/asset/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x.pdf?v=1&t=hdcl29bl&s=dd78f02b92e0f5544c136e7b897a7d65bcf5dc71&systemMessage=Wiley+Online+Library+will+be+disrupted+on+23+February+from+10%3A00-12%3A00+BST+%2805%3A00-07%3A00+EDT%29+for+essential+maintenance
Article first published online: 26 AUG 2005
DOI: 10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x
Japan Journal Cancer Research
Cancer Science, Wiley Online Library
Volume 83, Issue 5, pages 527–531, May 1992
Burzynski References: 1, 4 – 7 and 9
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1992.tb01960.x/references
Nishida (Japan) A-10 Reference: 2
——————————————————————
11/15/1995 – Sodium PHENYLACETATE Induces Growth Inhibition and Bcl-2 Down-Regulation and Apoptosis in MCF7ras Cells in Vitro and in nude mice
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/55/22/5156.abstract?sid=29b3d08f-4e59-473c-a804-10c68ed99112
Cancer Res. 1995 Nov 15;55(22):5156-60.
http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/55/22/5156.full.pdf
Institut d’Oncologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire Humaine, Bobigny, France.
http://m.cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/55/22/5156.full.pdf#page=1
References:
http://m.cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/55/22/5156
1. SAMID, D., Shac, S., and Sherman, L. T. Phenylacetate: a novel nontoxic inducer of tumor cell differentiation. Cancer Res., 52: 1988-1992, 1992
http://www.naderlibrary.com/burzynski.screen3.htm
——————————————————————
9/2001 – Sodium PHENYLACETATE enhances the inhibitory effect of dextran derivative on breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in nude mice
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2375080
Br J Cancer. 2001 September; 85(6): 917–923.
doi: 10.1054/bjoc.2001.1993
PMCID: PMC2375080
——————————————————————
3/2005 Effects of antineoplaston AS2-1 against post-operative lung metastasis in orthotopically implanted colon cancer in nude rat
Hideaki TSUDA
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15706406
Oncol Rep. 2005 Mar; 13 (3):389-95
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15706406
Oncol Rep 13 (3): 389-95 (2005)
http://www.spandidos-publications.com/or/13/3/389
Oncology Reports, 3/2005, Volume 13 Number 3
Pages: 389-395 Oncology Reports, Spandidos Publications
Department of Surgery, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume City, Fukuoka, Japan
——————————————————————
7 – 8/27/2007 Induction of apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by synthetic antineoplaston A10
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17695534
Induction of Apoptosis in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells by Synthetic Antineoplaston A10
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/17695534
Anticancer Res. 2007 Jul-Aug;27(4B):2427-31
http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/27/4B/2427.short
Anticancer Res 27(4B):2427-31 (2007)
http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/27/4B/2427.long
Anticancer Res. 7 – 8/2007; 27(4B):2427-31
http://ar.iiarjournals.org/content/27/4B/2427.full.pdf
Anticancer Research, Vol. 27, No. 4B, 2007, pp. 2427-2431
http://www.iiar-anticancer.org/main.php?pid=3398&id=2&ch=52&gch=&volume=27&issue=4B&show=details&page=2
Anticancer Research
HighWire Press
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan, Japan
International Journal of Cancer Treatment
Burzynski References: 1, 3, 5, 13 and 15
Badria (Egypt) A-10 References: 2 and 20
Wang A10 Reference: 4

References:

Adam L, Crépin M, Savin C, Israël L. Sodium phenylacetate induces growth inhibition and Bcl-2 down-regulation and apoptosis in MCF7ras cells in vitro and in nude mice. Cancer Res. 1995 Nov 15;55(22):5156–5160.

Shack S, Miller A, Liu L, Prasanna P, Thibault A, SAMID D. Vulnerability of multidrug-resistant tumor cells to the aromatic fatty acids phenylacetate and phenylbutyrate. Clin Cancer Res. 1996 May;2(5):865–872.

SAMID D, Shack S, Myers CE. Selective growth arrest and phenotypic reversion of prostate cancer cells in vitro by nontoxic pharmacological concentrations of phenylacetate. J Clin Invest. 1993 May;91(5):2288–2295.

SAMID D, Hudgins WR, Shack S, Liu L, Prasanna P, Myers CE. Phenylacetate and Phenylbutyrate as novel, nontoxic differentiation inducers. Adv Exp Med Biol. 1997;400A:501–505.

SAMID D, Wells M, Greene ME, Shen W, Palmer CN, Thibault A. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma as a novel target in cancer therapy: binding and activation by an aromatic fatty acid with clinical antitumor activity. Clin Cancer Res. 2000 Mar;6(3):933–941.

Thibault A, Cooper MR, Figg WD, Venzon DJ, Sartor AO, Tompkins AC, Weinberger MS, Headlee DJ, McCall NA, SAMID D, et al. A phase I and pharmacokinetic study of intravenous phenylacetate
in patients with cancer. Cancer Res. 1994 Apr 1;54(7):1690–1694.
——————————————————————
3/2005 – Effects of antineoplaston AS2-1 against post-operative lung metastasis in orthotopically implanted colon cancer in nude rat.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15706406
Matono K, Ogata Y, Tsuda H, Araki Y, Shirouzu K.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15706406
Oncol Rep. 2005 Mar;13(3):389-95
http://www.spandidos-publications.com/or/13/3/389
Oncology Reports
March 2005
Volume 13 Number 3
Department of Surgery, Kurume University School of Medicine, Kurume City, Fukuoka, Japan
——————————————————————
PUBLICATIONS BY STANISLAW RAJMUND BURZYNSKI AND ASSOCIATES
http://www.cancermed.com
——————————————————————
(former web-site screenshots)
http://www.circare.org/info/bri/burzynski_fdauntitled_promo_2012.pdf
——————————————————————
Stanislaw Rajmund Burzynski Publications:

https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/stanislaw-rajmund-burzynski-publications/

WHAT IS MISDIRECTION? Critiquing “Antineoplastons: Has the FDA kept its promise to the American people ?”

March 29, 1996

Then United States Food and Drug Administration Commissioner, David Kessler told the American people:

1. We will eliminate unnecessary paperwork … that used to delay or discourage … cancer research … by non-commercial clinical investigators

2. The … FDA’s initiatives … will allow …the agency … to rely on smaller trialsfewer patients … if there is evidence … of partial response in clinical trials

I don’t want to get into any particular … agent … except let me point out … that … the information needs to be part … of clinical trials

3. We will accept … less informationup front

4. we’re going to require further study AFTERapproval … because the science … has matured

5. The important – point … is that information needs to be gathered … through scientific means … through clinical – trials … and I think – that’s … that’s very important uhh very … important point

You can’t … just … use an agent here – or there … you have to use it … as part of a clinical trial … so we can get information … on whether the drug works

6. The uhh agency has … many … trials … has has approved trials … for patients … with antineoplastons

7. We are committed to providing expanded access … availability … for American patients for any drug … there’s reason to believe … may work
——————————————————————
BOTTOM LINE:
——————————————————————
Everything else is MISDIRECTION
——————————————————————
https://stanislawrajmundburzynski.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/antineoplastons-has-the-fda-kept-its-promise-to-the-american-people
——————————————————————
A. What is the FDA’s definition of “unnecessary paperwork”?

B. What is the FDA’s definition of “smaller trials”?

C. What is the FDA’s definition of “fewer patients”?

D. What is the FDA’s definition of “evidence … of partial response“?

E. What is the FDA’s definition of “less information … up front”?

F. What is the FDA’s definition of “we’re going to require further study AFTER … approval”?

G. What is the FDA’s definition of “We are committed to providing expanded access … availability … for American patients for any drug … there’s reason to believe … may work”?
======================================
2003 – 2009 Phase II preliminary
——————————————————————
2003 – Phase II
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12718563
Drugs R D. 2003;4(2):91-101
(Drugs in R and D / Drugs in Research and Development)

2003: Protocol – recurrent diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma

12 – Patients Accrued
10 – Evaluable Patients

2 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
3 / 30% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
3 / 30% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
2 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/scientific-publications.html
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

1. 10/2003

NEURO-ONCOLOGY

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R.A., Bestak, M., Lewy, R.I., Janicki, T.J., Jurida, G.F., Paszkowiak, J.K., Szymkowski, B.G., Khan, M.I.

Phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in children with recurrent and progressive MULTICENTRIC GLIOMA

A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/970.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2003; 5: 358
Volume 5 Issue 4 October 2003

10/2003 – Protocol – MULTICENTRIC GLIOMA

12 – Children Patients Accrued
10 – Evaluable Patients
(9 months-17 years / 9 – median age)

4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 25% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
0 / 0% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
1 / 9% – # and % of Patients Nonevaluable due to only 4 weeks of treatment / lack of follow-up scans
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

16. 2003

DRUGS IN R&D
Drugs in R and D
(Drugs in Research and Development)

BT-11
BRAIN STEM GLIOMA

Phase II study of antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in patients with recurrent diffuse intrinsic BRAIN STEM GLIOMA:

a preliminary report.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12718563
Burzynski, S.R., Lewy, R.I., Weaver, R.A., Axler, M.L., Janicki, T.J., Jurida, G.F., Paszkowiak, J.K., Szymkowski, B.G., Khan, M.I., Bestak, M.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12718563
Drugs R D. 2003;4(2):91-101
Drugs in R&D 2003;4:91-101
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/960.pdf

Pgs. 91-92 and 95

3/1996 – Protocol – recurrent diffuse intrinsic BRAIN STEM GLIOMA (3/1996 – 5/1999 enrolled / Pg. 94)

12 – Patients Accrued (6 males / 6 females)
(4-29 years / 10 – median age)
10 – Evaluable Patients

2 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
3 / 30% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
3 / 30% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
2 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
2004 – Phase II
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15563234
Drugs R D. 2004;5(6):315-26
(Drugs in R and D / Drugs in Research and Development)

2004: Protocol – incurable recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma

12 – Patients Accrued
(9 – median age)
11 – Evaluable Patients

4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
3 / 25% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
0 / 0% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

2. 10/2004

NEURO-ONCOLOGY

BT-20
Patients With GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME (GBM)

Weaver, R.A., Burzynski, S.R., Bestak, M., Lewy, R.I., Janicki, T.J., Szymkowski, B., Jurida, G., Khan, M.I., Dolgopolov, V.

Phase II study of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in recurrent GLIOBLASTOMA MULTIFORME
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1218.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 384
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Society for Neuro-Oncology Ninth Annual Meeting, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, November 18-21, 2004

Pg. 385

10/2004 – Protocol – glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) which recurred or progressed post surgery, radiation therapy, and / or chemotherapy

22 – Evaluable Patients
(6 men / 16 women / 27-63 /47 – median age)

1 / 4.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
1 / 4.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
12 / 54.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
8 / 36.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

3. 10/2004 (DBSG)

NEURO-ONCOLOGY

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R. Bestak. M., Lewy, R.I., Janicki, T., Jurida, G., Szymkowski, B., Khan, M., Dolgopolov, V.

Long-term survivals in phase II studies of Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in patients with diffuse intrinsic BRAIN STEM GLIOMA
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1219.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 386
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004

60 patients
(31 didn’t meet admission criteria to the study and were treated under Special Exception (SE))

10/2004 – Protocol – patients with diffuse intrinsic BRAIN STEM GLIOMA (DBSG)

29 – Evaluable Patients

7 / 24% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
6 / 21% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
6 / 21% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
10 / 34% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
——————————————————————
31 – Evaluable Patients: Special exception (SE)

5 / 16% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 6% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
16 / 52% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
8 / 26% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

4. 10/2004 (AT/RT of CNS)

NEURO-ONCOLOGY

BT-14

CHILDREN WITH RHABDOID TUMOR OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R. Bestak. M., Janicki, T., Jurida, G., Szymkowski, B., Khan, M., Dolgopolov, V.

Phase II studies of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP) in children with atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors (AT/RT) of the central nervous system

A preliminary report
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1146.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 427
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Eleventh International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Boston, Massachusetts, June 13-16, 2004

10/2004 – Protocol – children with atypical teratoid / rhabdoid tumors (AT / RT) of the central nervous system

11 – Children Patients Accrued
8 – Evaluable Patients
(7 treated under Special Exception (SE))

2 / 25% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
1 / 12.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
1 / 12.5% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
4 / 50% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

5. 10/2004

NEURO-ONCOLOGY

BT-12

CHILDREN WITH PRIMITIVE NEUROECTODERMAL TUMORS (PNET)

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R. Bestak. M., Janicki, T., Szymkowski, B., Jurida, G., Khan, M., Dolgopolov, V.

Treatment of PRIMITIVE NEUROECTODERMAL TUMORS (PNET) with antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 (ANP)

Preliminary results of phase II studies
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1147.pdf
Neuro-Oncology. 2004; 6: 428
Volume 6 Issue 4 October 2004
Abstracts from the Eleventh International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology

10/2004 – Protocol – PRIMITIVE NEUROECTODERMAL TUMORS (PNET)

17 – Patients Accrued
15 – Evaluable Patients
(12 months – 23 years / 6 – median age)

3 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 13.4% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
5 / 33.3% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
5 / 33.3% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

17. 2004

DRUGS IN R&D
Drugs in R and D
(Drugs in Research and Development)

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R., Lewy, R., Janicki, T. Jurida, G., Szymkowski, B., Khan, M., Bestak, M.

Phase II study of antineoplaston A10 and AS2-1 in children with recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma.

A Preliminary Report.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15563234
Drugs R&D 2004;5(6):315-326.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15563234
Drugs R D. 2004;5(6):315-26
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1194.pdf

incurable recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma

Pg. 320

3 – treated under Special Exception (SE) granted by the US FDA

Pgs. 317 and 320

7/31/1996 – (7/31/1996 – 4/3/2002 as of 3/1/2004) Protocol – children with recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma (MCG)

Pg. 317

BT-13

children with low-grade astrocytoma

BT-23

children with visual pathway gliomas


Pgs. 317 and 320-321

12 – Children Patients Accrued (Pgs. 315-316)
(9 months – 17 years / 9- median age)
(6 – male / 6 – females)
10 – Evaluable Patients (Pg. 315)

4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
3 / 25% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 33% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
0 / 0% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
1 / 9% – # and % of Patients Non-evaluable
——————————————————————
Pg. 325

Compare: Chamberlain and Grafe. [38]

1995 – Protocol – solitary recurrent chiasmatic hypothalamic gliomas treated with oral etoposide


14 – Patients Accrued
14 – Evaluable Patients

1 / 7% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
4 / 29% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
3 / 21% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
6 / 43% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease

Pg. 326

38. Chamberlain MC, Grafe MR. Recurrent chiasmatic-hypothalamic glioma treated with oral etoposide. J Clin Oncol 1995; 13: 2072-6
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7636550/
J Clin Oncol. 1995 Aug;13(8):2072-6.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7636550/
Department of Neurosciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.
http://m.jco.ascopubs.org/content/13/8/2072.long
Arch Neurol. 1995 May;52(5):509-13.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7733847/
Department of Neurosciences, University of California-San Diego, USA.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/7733847/
Arch Neurol. 1995;52(5):509-513. doi:10.1001/archneur.1995.00540290099024.
http://archneur.jamanetwork.com/Mobile/article.aspx?articleid=593460
——————————————————————
Compare: The Pediatric Oncology Group. [39]

10/2000 – Protocol – solitary progressive optic pathway tumors with carboplatin

50 – Patients Accrued
50 – Evaluable Patients

2 / 4% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
37 / 74% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
11 / 22% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease

39. Mahoney DH, Cohen ME, Friedman HS, et al. Carboplatin is effective therapy for young children with progressive optic pathway tumors: a Pediatric Oncology Group phase II study. Neuro-oncol 2000; 2: 213-20
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11265230/
Neuro Oncol. 2000 Oct;2(4):213-20.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/11265230/
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1920597/

http://neuro-oncology.oxfordjournals.org/content/2/4/213.full.pdf
======================================
2005 – Phase II
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/15911929
Integr Cancer Ther. 2005 Jun;4(2):168-77
(Integrative Cancer Therapies)

2005: Protocol – recurrent disease or high risk

13 – Patients Accrued
(1-11 – age / 5 years 11 months – median age)
13 – Evaluable Patients

3 / 23% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
1 / 8% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 31% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
5 / 38% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
——————————————————————
(Updated 2007)
http://www.cancer-therapy.org/CT/v5/B/HTML/42._Burzynski,_379-390.html
2005 – Protocol – incurable recurrent and progressive multicentric glioma

13 – Patients Accrued

3 / 23% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
1 / 8% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 31% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
5 / 38% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
2006 – Phase II
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16484713
Integr Cancer Ther. 2006 Mar;5(1):40-7
(Integrative Cancer Therapies)

2006: Protocol – high-grade pathology (HBSG)

– Patients Accrued
18 – Evaluable Patients

2 / 11% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 11% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
7 / 39% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
7 / 39% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

BT-03


BT-11

BRAIN STEM GLIOMA (BSG)

BT-18

6. MIXED GLIOMA

ADULT PATIENTS WITH MIXED GLIOMA

“mixed glioma”, a type of primary malignant brain tumor (PMBT)

BT-22

8. CHILDREN WITH PRIMARY MALIGNANT BRAIN TUMORS

CAN-01 (CAN-1)

PATIENTS WITH REFRACTORY MALIGNANCIES

19. 3/2006

Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Weaver, R.A., Burzynski, B. Targeted therapy with Antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 of high grade, recurrent, and progressive BRAINSTEM GLIOMA. Integrative Cancer Therapies 2006;5(1):40-47
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16484713
Integr Cancer Ther. 2006 Mar;5(1):40-7
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/16484713
DOI: 10.1177/1534735405285380
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/5825.pdf

http://m.ict.sagepub.com/content/5/1/40.long?view=long&pmid=16484713
Pgs. 40-41

4 phase 2 trials

BRAINSTEM GLIOMA (BSG)

patients with inoperable tumor of high-grade pathology (HBSG)
glioblastoma

recurrent diffuse intrinsic glioblastomas and ANAPLASTIC ASTROCYTOMAs of brainstem

Pg. 43

BT-03 – 1 / female
BT-11 – 13 (8 males/5 females)
BT-18 – 1 / female
BT-22 – 2 / females
CAN-01 – 1 / female

Pg. 44

High-grade, recurrent, and progressive brainstem gliomas

Pgs. 40-42 and 44-45

7/12/1988 (7/12/1988 – 11/13/2003 as of 6/10/2005) – Protocol – recurrent diffuse intrinsic glioblastomas and anaplastic astrocytomas of the brainstem high-grade pathology (HBSG)

18 – Evaluable Patients (Pgs. 40-43)
(8 males / 10 females / 2-42 / 10 – median age / Pgs. 42-43)

2 / 11% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 11% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
7 / 39% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
7 / 39% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

BT-11

BRAIN STEM GLIOMA

8. 10/2006

Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Weaver, R.A., Szymkowski, B.G., Khan, M.I., Dolgopolov, V. Treatment of multicentric BRAINSTEM GLIOMAs with antineoplastons (ANP) A10 and AS2-1. Neuro-Oncology. 2006; 8:466.
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/2105.pdf
Volume 8 Issue 4 October 2006
Abstracts for the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO)

Brainstem gliomas and multicentric tumors (MBSG)

10/2006 – Protocol – Brainstem gliomas and multicentric tumors (MBSG)

19 – Evaluable Patients
3.9 – 40.8 years (9.2 – median age)
(90% less than 18 years old)

2 / 11% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
1 / 5% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
7 / 37% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
9 / 47% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
======================================
2007
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/1252.pdf
2004 – Protocol – small group of patients with progressive LGA, ANP
60% – % of Patients Showing Complete Response
10% – % of Patients Showing Partial Response
——————————————————————
2004 – Protocol – low-grade astrocytoma in children
Burzynski [39] – Reference
Phase II d – d = Preliminary results – Study type
P – P = progressive tumor – Tumor type
(no. of pts) – pts = patients
ANP (10) – ANP = antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 – Treatment
10 – Evaluable Patients {(78) = most in a study}
OS [%] – OS = overall survival
100% (1 yr) – 90% (3 yr) – Efficacy
93 mo – MST = MST = median survival time – {96 (1 y) next closest}
60% (6) – % and # of Patients Showing Complete Response {24 (11) next closest}
10% (1) – % and # of Patients Showing Partial Response {60% (9) best other study}
30% (3) – % and # of Patients Showing Stable Disease + MR = minor response {70% (14) best other study}
0% (0) – % and # of Patients Showing Progressive Disease {4% (2) next closest}
PFS (%)
90 (1 y) – 90 (3 y) – PFS = progression-free survival {100 (1 y) – 68 (3 y) best other study
——————————————————————
2004 – Protocol – diffuse, intrinsic brainstem glioma in children
Burzynski et al. [88] – Reference
Phase II – Study Type
(no. of pts) – pts = patients
RP (30) – RP = recurrent and progressive tumor – Tumor type
30 – Evaluable Patients
ANP – ANP = antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 – Treatment – ANP
OS (%) – OS = overall survival
[2y; 5y]
46.7; 30 – Efficacy
MST (mo)
19.9 – MST = median survival time
27% (8) – % and # of Patients Showing Complete Response
20% (6) – % and # of Patients Showing Partial Response
23% (7) – % and # of Patients Showing Stable Disease
30% (9) – % and # of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
——————————————————————
Burzynski et al. [89] – Reference
Phase II – Study Type
(no. of pts) – pts = patients
RPS (10) – RPS = recurrent and progressive tumors in children aged <4y – Tumor type {(66) = most in a study}
ANP – ANP = antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 – Treatment – ANP
OS (%) – OS = overall survival
[2y; 5y] – Efficacy
60; 20 {46.7 (30) = next best study}
MST (mo)
26.3 – MST = median survival time – {19.9 = next best study}
[% (no. )]
30% (3) – CR = complete response – {27% (8) = next best study}
[% (no. )]
0% (0) – PR = partial response – {56% (1) = next best}
[% (no. )]
40% (4) – SD = stable disease – {44% (25) = best}
[% (no. )]
30% (3) – PD = progressive disease – {23% (13) = best}
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Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

BT-11

BRAIN STEM GLIOMA

9. 4/2007 (NDBSG)

Burzynski, S.R., Weaver, R.A., Janicki, T.J., Jurida, G.F., Szymkowski, B.G., Kubove, E. Phase II studies of Antineoplastons A10 and AS 2-1 (ANP) in children with newly diagnosed diffuse, intrinsic BRAINSTEM GLIOMAs. Neuro-Oncology 2007; 9:206.
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/4021.pdf
Volume 9 Issue 2 April 2007
Abstracts from the Twelfth International Symposium on Pediatric Neuro-Oncology

4/2007 – Protocol – newly diagnosed diffuse, intrinsic BRAINSTEM GLIOMAs (NDBSG)

20 – Evaluable assessable children Patients
(3 months-20 years – age)

6 / 30% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 10% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
4 / 20% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
8 / 40% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
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Interim Reports on Clinial Trials:

BT-11

BRAIN STEM GLIOMA

Special exception (SE)

13. 12/2009 (DBSG)

Burzynski, S.R., Janicki, T.J., Weaver, R.A., Szymkowski, B., Burzynski, G.S. Phase II study of antineoplastons A10 and AS2-1 in patients with BRAINSTEM GLIOMA. Protocol BC-BT-11. Neuro-Oncology 2009, 11:951.
http://www.burzynskiclinic.com/images/stories/Publications/8639.pdf
Volume 11 Issue 6 December 2009
Abstracts from the Third Quadrennial Meeting of the World Federation of Neuro-Oncology (WFNO) and the Sixth Meeting of the Asian Society for Neuro-Oncology (ASNO)
May 11-14, 2009
Yokohama, Japan

12/2009 – Protocol – BRAINSTEM GLIOMAs

40 – Patients Accrued
28 – Evaluable Patients
(23 children / 5 young adults)

5 / 18% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
4 / 14% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
12 / 43% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
7 / 25% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
——————————————————————
Special exception (SE)

12/2009 – Protocol – BRAINSTEM GLIOMAs

52 – Evaluable Patients
(40 children / 12 young adults)

5 / 10% – # and % of Patients Showing Complete Response
2 / 4% – # and % of Patients Showing Partial Response
28 / 54% – # and % of Patients Showing Stable Disease
17 / 32% – # and % of Patients Showing Progressive Disease
——————————————————————
BT-11 and special exception (SE)
92% – diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas (DBSG)

Overall survival (OS) – 2 years:
42% – special exception (SE)
36% – BT-11

Overall survival (OS) – 5 years:
19% – special exception (SE)
25% – BT-11
======================================
Compare: standard radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy (RAT) (Mandell et al. 1999)

2% – % of Patients Showing Complete Response
31% – % of Patients Showing Partial Response

Mandell LR, Kadota R, Freeman C, et al. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brain stem tumors: results of pediatric oncology group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999;43:959-964.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10192340/
Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1999 Mar 15;43(5):959-64.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/10192340/
International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics
Volume 43, Issue 5, 15 March 1999, Pages 959–964
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036030169800501X
Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
6/1992 – 10/1997

Overall survival (OS):
7% – 2 years
0% – 5 years
=====================================
COMBINED:
——————————————————————
Overall survival (OS) – 2 years:
——————————————————————
42% – antineoplastons: special exception (SE)

36% – antineoplastons: BT-11

7% – standard radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy (RAT)
——————————————————————
Overall survival (OS) – 5 years:
——————————————————————
25% – antineoplastons: BT-11

19% – antineoplastons: special exception (SE)

0% – standard radiation therapy in combination with chemotherapy (RAT)
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Break The Walls Down:

——————————————————————
And “THAT’s The BOTTOM LINE”
Because Stone Cold Said So

——————————————————————
IT’s GO TIME
Time To Play The Game:

——————————————————————
Break The Walls Down:

=====================================